Tag Archives: The Americans

5 Years of Blogging: Top 5 Writers and Directors

After a few gaming related updates, I felt like doing a more film/tv focused one, so without further ado, here’s my favourite 5 writers and directors from TV and film.

Top 5 Writers:

5: The Duffer Brothers (Stranger Things): I have to give the Duffer Brothers credit. When new sci-fi shows are constantly failing to deliver (Star Trek: Discovery, Lost in Space, Chibnall’s version of Doctor Who) or failing to connect with audiences (Netflix’s Nightflyers and Another Life) Stranger Things has delivered 3 seasons running, and that’s largely due to their excellent writing producing great characters, engaging storylines and genuinely funny comedy. Stranger Things may not be all that original, but it is consistent in its quality and entertainment value, so the two of them have to make it onto this list, seeing as they have written the majority of episodes thus far.

4: Joel Fields and Joe Weisburg (The Americans): Given that the Americans is arguably the best and most consistently written show this decade, I had to put the two lead writers on this list. Between them Joel and Joe wrote all of the premieres, finales and a lot of other episodes in between, including some of the ones with the largest plot developments. If you’re yet to catch this remarkable (if very slow) TV spy thriller, then the writing is the main reason i’d recommend checking it out. Character development is consistent and nuanced, the plot doesn’t suddenly veer into left field for no reason, and of the 6 seasons, 5 are fantastic and the remaining 1 (season 5) is still good, if uneventful. Only the fact that these writers haven’t worked on much else yet prevents them going further up the list.

3: Robert Holmes (Classic Who, Blakes 7): I like sci-fi, even old sci-fi like Classic Who and Blakes 7 where the special effects are neither special nor that effective. Old sci-fi had to rely on writing and acting to keep people invested, and there was no better TV sci-fi writer in the 70’s and early than Robert Holmes. If you see classic Who episodes on Top 10 or Top 20 lists in Doctor Who Magazine or online websites, odds are there are Holmes’ ones. He didn’t write all the best episodes, but he wrote an awful lot of them. Who’s debt to him is enormous, and that doesn’t just stem from him being the scriptwriter during the shows most popular classic period (1974-1976, i.e. Tom Baker’s first three seasons). He created the Autons and the Sontarans, introduced the Third Doctor and the Master and wrote Peter Davison’s fantastic regeneration story: The Caves of Androzani. His work on other sci-fi shows like Blakes 7 (where his story Orbit ranks as one of the darkest and best) shows he wasn’t a one trick pony. Russell T. Davies has often highlighted Holmes as one of his favourite Who writers, and for once I must agree with RTD. The man was a legend in all things Who, and the show was all the poorer for it after Holmes tragically passed away in 1986.

2: Phoebe Waller-Bridge (Fleabag, Killing Eve): Anyone responsible for two of the best new shows in the past few years has to be a great writer. Waller-Bridge’s trademark dark humour and quirky yet believable characters has proved an award winning mix twice now, first with Fleabag and then with Killing Eve’s first season. The news that Waller-Bridge has been drafted into to work on the final Daniel Craig Bond film has got me far more interested in what the eventual film can deliver. Both as an actress and a writer, Waller-Bridge is a hit right now, and anything she writes is going to be something people take note of. Her status as a rising star wins her the second spot on this list, but who knows? If I rewrite this in 5 years, she may top it the rate she’s shooting to stardom.

1: Steven Moffat (Doctor Who, Coupling, Sherlock, Jekyll): It’s was always going to be Moffat. Being head writer for one of my favourite shows was one thing, being lead writer for four of them is another. Moffat’s ability to write complex, engaging stories with high quality comedy, horror, suspense and drama makes him easily my favourite writer for television. He has the odd weakness as a showrunner, but his writing is very hard to fault. Just look at the episodes he’s written for Doctor Who: The Empty Child, The Girl in the Fireplace, Blink, The Eleventh Hour, The Day of the Doctor, Listen, Heaven Sent, World Enough and Time… they are all masterpieces. His hit rate is astonishing (and all the more impressive given the clusterfuck the shows been since he left). Sherlock and Jekyll are great shows in genres I don’t normally follow, and Coupling still ranks as one of my favourite comedies. So Moffat has to take the top spot. Other writers like Waller-Bridge may eventually surpass him, but Moffat’s consistency and great run of hits mean he’ll be my favourite for a while yet.

Top 5 Directors:

5: Antony and Joe Russo: (The Winter Soldier, Civil War, Infinity War, Endgame) The Russo brothers are responsible for pretty much all of the best MCU films, and were a step up from Joss Whedon as the showrunners for the main avengers films. Direction in the MCU is very haphazard – especially during fight scenes – Black Panther looked downright terrible at points in its third act because of bad direction coupled with weak CGI (those stupid rhinos), while Spiderman Homecoming’s major flaw had to be its fight scenes. You don’t get those problems with the Russo brothers – The Winter Soldier is arguably the most grown-up and best put together film in the series, while Civil War, Infinity War and Endgame were all exceptional Blockbuster epics, and I can’t remember any scenes where I’d change one thing about the direction. A very safe pair of hands – and ones who consistently deliver.

4: Ron Howard (Rush, Angels and Demons, Apollo 13, Frost/Nixon) Howard’s not the best director in the world, but he’s up there. Just look at the types of films he’s been responsible for – historical biopics like Rush and Frost/Nixon, thrillers like Apollo 13 and The Da Vinci Code and big budget space heist movies (Solo: A Star Wars Story). He’s a versatile director who doesn’t just stick to one genre. He’s been responsible for some of my favourite movies and while he’s had the occasional misstep (his adaptation of Inferno for example) he knows how to make entertaining films and is very consistent at doing so. It helps that he seems to have Hans Zimmer on speed-dial – the two have collaborated a lot, and its a pairing that works – as is Howard and Tom Hanks, who’ve worked together frequently many times to great effect.

3: Rachel Talalay: (Doctor Who – Heaven Sent, Dark Water, Twice Upon a Time, World Enough and Time). Doctor Who’s directors have always been a mixed bag – particularly towards the end of the Moffat era and the transition to the garbage that is Chibnall’s current reign. One who always shined regardless of the material she was given was Rachel Talalay. Just look at the episodes she directed – there’s a reason Moffat kept trusting her with his series finales and Capaldi’s final episode. She excels at delivering the darker, weightier, scarier instalments of Who. So many great scenes (such as the Missy Reveal, Breaking the Wall and The Master’s return) owe a lot to her standard of direction. In a way its a pity she only came in at series 8 – the 50th anniversary in her hands might have been even better than it already was. That’s how good she is!

2: Miguel Saponchik: (Game of Thrones – Hardhome, Battle of the Bastards, The Winds of Winter, The Bells) Game of Thrones had some excellent directors during its run, whatever you think of the writing. But the most amount of credit has to go to Saponchik, who directed some of the shows most ambitious and memorable battle sequences. The White Walkers’ attack on Hardhome, Jon Snow’s battle with Ramsay, Cersei blowing up the Sept of Baelor, The Night King’s assault on Winterfell and Daenerys’ destruction of King’s Landing – all were brought from script to screen by this guy, who managed to produce battles worthy of cinema on a fraction of the budget a blockbuster film would have. Can’t wait to see what he works on next.

1: Christopher Nolan: (The Dark Knight Trilogy, Interstellar, Inception) It had to be really. Nolan is renowned as a director and filmmaker and there’s a reason fans are constantly badgering him to have a crack at a Bond Film. He’s one of the few director you can honestly say has never made a bad film, and might even be the only one who has ALWAYS made great or amazing ones. The Dark Knight trilogy is what he’s most known for, and rightly so, but his other films like Dunkirk, Inception and Interstellar have all got warm receptions from critics and audiences. If he has a weakness its shooting hand-to-hand fight scenes (this is the sole weak point in Batman Begins), but his grasp of action scenes in general is amazing. Ultimately, this is the man who made Batman cool again after Joel Schumacher nearly killed the character’s status off for good in 1995. Nolan’s amazing track record coupled with the fact he’s responsible for 3 of my favourite films means he was always going to come top of this category, and I doubt many people will disagree with that.

The Best and Worst TV of 2018

So, after films, we’re onto TV. I’m not going to run through all the stuff I’ve seen for this one, mainly because I’ve not caught up with a lot of US TV shows like Arrow and Legends of Tomorrow, so I can only review half the episodes from this year. Bear in mind I’ve not seen some of the best received stuff this year (The Bodyguard, A Very English Scandal etc.) so this is basely solely off what I’ve seen and is my opinion, not a definitive list! Feel free to comment your own best/worst shows below.

I’ll try to keep this as spoiler free as possible.

Top Five:

1. The Americans (Season 6) – The best way to some up the quality of this sublime spy drama set in the cold war is as follows: even if Game of Thrones absolutely nails Season 8 next year with battle scenes above Lord of the Rings intensity and standard, I’ll probably still name The Americans as the TV show of the Decade. It’s been that good. It’s had 5 great seasons and 1 that was merely good, but that’s still a better hit rate than any other six season show I can think of. I’ve given perhaps one episode in its entire run 3.5/5. Everything else has been 4/5 or (usually) even higher. The final season somehow managed to ramp things up a gear while still remaining the slow burning tense classic its always been. Not only did it use the masterstroke of having lead KGB spies Philip and Elizabeth on opposite sides for most of the season, but we finally saw FBI agent Stan Beeman close in on them, leading to an electrifyingly tense and devastating finale, as the Jennings finally had to face the consequences of their actions. It didn’t tie up all lose ends, but this show has always been too clever for that. After all, how many spy operations do you think have a definite, clean ending? Either way, it was utterly unmissable television, and while its one for the connoisseur rather than the mainstream, it still seems a shame that most people still haven’t had a chance to see it.

2. I’m a Celebrity (UK Series 18) – I’m not normally one for reality TV, but this had such a good line-up that I just had to give it a go. I do like I’m a celeb, but usually they have truly detestable celebs on there, like Katie Price or Gemma Collins, so I’ve avoided it for the past few years. This year though, has to be the best run the shows ever had in the UK. Not only did we have Harry Redknapp turning himself into a true national treasure with his stories, but we had Anne Hegerty battling against the odds to overcome some deep personal challenges. The show was largely heart-warming because everyone there was genuinely pleasant for the most part. Even Noel Edmonds, who you could tell was only brought in to stir things up, proved to be a pretty nice guy for most of the run. Even more surprisingly, the celebs were all very good at the trials – I don’t think I’ve ever seen this many full houses of stars! Though admittedly, they were amusingly awful at the dingo dollar challenges. The best thing of all though, had to be the cute friendship between John Barrowman (who had a song for every occasion) and Emily Atack (who was adorably cute and mischievous). If 2018 needed something, it was definitely this series, which for a few blissful weeks almost made you forget about Trump and the mess being made of Brexit.

3. Orange is the New Black (Season 6) It may not have been OITNB’s best season, but it was still Netflix’s top effort this year. Throwing all the inmates into maximum security really allowed the show to mix this up with a tenser atmosphere and some new inmates and guards. With the usual mix of comedy, dark storylines and romance (including some very surprising pairings – who’d have thought 5 years ago that Caputo and Fig would be the easiest couple on the show to root for?). ‘Badison’ made one of the show’s most detestable villains in years (probably the nastiest one since Vee in season 2) and the shows closer focus on some of the characters really allowed them to shine more than normal (Daya, Freida and Nicky in particular). Ultimately, it could have had a better overall plotline, but its set the stage for the final season well enough to scrape into my top 3.

4. Big Mouth (Season 2) Easily the funniest show on Netflix at the moment, Big Mouth is a hilarious send up of puberty that only an animated show could get away with (for obvious reasons). It has its share of family guy-esque gross out comedy and your typical teenage awkward humour, but what makes this unique is the fact it takes time to focus on both genders difficulties (usually these kind of comedies only go with one or the other) and actively personifies those awkward, stupid teenage impulses in the form of ‘hormone monsters’ who actively encourage the characters to ask each other out or to do any number of stupid things, usually with hilariously destructive or embarrassing results. It may sound ridiculous, but its worth a shot and will probably have you poking fun at your own awkward teenage experiences subconsciously – while answering all the questions you’d wished you’d had answers to ten years ago. 

5. Jessica Jones (Season 2) Despite the lack of a signature villain to rival David Tennant’s Kilgrave, Jessica Jones managed to be the most compelling superhero show this year (bearing in mind that I don’t watch Daredevil). Krysten Ritter remains one of the best actresses in Netflix’s employ, and Jessica’s self-destructive tendencies remained firmly in sight this year, particularly with Trish, Malcolm and Hogarth all having various crises of their own around her. Trish really became one of the most hateable characters on TV this series, and whether season 3 pulls off one hell of a redemption story or has her go full villain it’ll be interesting to see. The icing on the cake though, had to be Jessica’s Kilgrave hallucinations in episode 11. It was great to have David Tennant back even for just one episode, and having him play the devil on Jessica’s shoulder was a stroke of genius! Sure the first episode wasn’t great and it was still 2 or so episodes too long, but overall the series was less padded than arrow verse shows, more interesting than Luke Cage and less ridiculous than Gotham or Black Lightning.

Bottom Three:

3. Lost in Space (Netflix) – Netflix’s Lost in Space remake looked amazing, but felt hollow. It was billed as old-fashioned sci-fi, and to be honest that’s what it felt like. It was an adventure with plenty of threat and peril, but little substance or innovation. The cast worked well for the most part, even if Parker Posey’s Dr. Smith was an underwhelming villain. It was well directed and had good special effects, but ultimately, it was a very forgettable ride. Netflix can do a lot better.

2. Doctor Who Series 11 (BBC One) – Oh god, where to start with this one. How to ruin a 50+ year old show in one series? The most miscast actress possible in the title role? How to lose all the shows’ hardcore fans in a single series and achieve an audience score of 28% (and FALLING!) on Rotten Tomatoes? This isn’t Doctor Who. Its a Politically Correct Nightmare of ham-fisted dialogue, woeful villains, weak companions and patronising themes. Chris Chibnall shows his mishandling of Torchwood Series 1 and 2 was no accident – he’s even worse here. Bradley Walsh is the sole redeeming factor, but he can’t save this mess by himself. If you get past episode 5 without giving up, you’re probably a masochist or someone who’s never seen the show before. Utterly dire.

1. Britannia (Sky) – This is one mindf*ck of a show. Set during the Roman Invasion of Britain, it features a heavy emphasis on the Celts’ reaction to the Roman threat and the druids’ influence over the Britons. It has an all star cast, including Zoe Wanamaker, David Morrissey and Ian MacDiarmid, but its just so weird. The plot makes no sense, the supernatural elements feel decidedly out of place, the theme music is dire and some episodes are a real slog to get through. You might be intrigued by it initially, but honestly don’t bother. Its a total waste of your time.

Best Actor: Matthew Rhys (The Americans)

Best Actress: Krysten Ritter (Jessica Jones)/Keri Russell (The Americans)

Best Supporting Actor: Mustafa Shakir (Luke Cage)

Best Supporting Actress: Selenis Leyva (Orange is the New Black)

Best Special Effects: Lost in Space

Best Animated Show: Big Mouth

Best TV Show: The Americans

Best Episode: The Americans – Dead Hand

Best Writing: The Americans

Best Soundtrack: The Americans

Best Theme Tune: Big Mouth

Best Direction: The Americans

Best on-screen pair: Emily Atack and John Barrowman (I’m a celebrity)

Best Hero – Jessica Jones

Best Villain – Bushmaster (Luke Cage)

Worst Hero: The 13th Doctor (Doctor Who)

Worst Villain Tzim-Shaue/Tim Shaw (Doctor Who)

Worst Actor: Nikolaj Lee Kaas (Britannia)

Worst Actress: Jodie Whittaker (Doctor Who)

Worst Supporting Actor: Tosin Cole (Doctor Who)

Worst Supporting Actress: Parker Posey (Lost in Space)

Worst Writing: Chris Chibnall (Doctor Who)

Worst Episode: Britannia – Episode 7

Worst Soundtrack: Britannia

Worst TV Show: Britannia

 

My Top 10 TV Shows of 2016

I only did a top 5 last year but I felt I’d watched considerably more this time, so a top 10 seemed more appropriate.

Minor spoilers for all shows – no real specifics though, don’t worry.

10. Gotham (Season 2 Part 2/Season 3 Part 1) Gotham has often been considered the problem child of the DC universe – it isn’t part of the Arrowverse or the movies and thus sits awkwardly in the middle. Its tone tends to be wildly uneven – one episode gave us the hilariously OTT ending of Butch blowing up a villain with a Bazooka while another had the incredibly tense sequence where the Mad Hatter forced Jim to choose which of his two love interests was shot. However, this year has seen arguably its best run of episodes yet, with a superb Mr. Freeze origin story, a very sweet romance between the teenage Bruce and Selina, a great main villain in season 3 in the Mad Hatter and the winning combination of Penguin and Riddler, who are arguably the best villains on any superhero show right now. The show has miss-stepped a fair few times (the godawful Gordon in prison episode, two lacklustre season finales) but overall its showing great promise, and the first six episodes of season 3 were simply amazing.

9. The Grand Tour (Series 1) Clarkson, Hammond and May’s return may be a mixed bag of the hilarious and the cringe worthy, but overall its been a very welcome addition as well as the main reason to fork out for Amazon Prime. There’s been a few duff moments (particularly in the second episode ‘Operation Desert Stumble) but overall its given us all of the comedy, cars and catastrophe we wanted. It goes without saying, its completely trounced (and savagely mocked) the travesty/pile of excrement which was the Chris Evans version. Serves the BBC right.

8. IZombie (Season 2 Part 2) Anyone who’s not tried IZombie due to the stupid sounding title should really give it a second thought. The unique plotline it has (Zombies gain temporary memories/personality traits from the brains they eat, which allows main character Liv to solve the murders of people who end up in the morgue she works in) really opens up a wealth of storytelling potential, while also leading to some great comedy (the episodes where Liv eats the brain of an erotic novelist spring to mind, though there’s plenty of others with great comedy from similar ideas). The second half of season two in particular ramps up the drama element as more of the main cast find out about Liv’s true nature and the company that created the Zombie outbreak comes under the spotlight. Roll on season 3!

7. The Great British Bake Off (The final series that anyone will bother watching) Second only to the terrible Top Gear reboot in the list of BBC cock-ups this year was the loss of Bake Off to Channel 4 (seriously, who the fuck will watch it with no Mel, Sue, Mary as well as having to put up with sodding ad-breaks). I may have been a late-comer to the series, but the sheer charm of it all won me over and as it is it’s unofficial swansong, I thought i’d include it in my list. Full of the brilliant Mel/Sue interplay with the contestants, lavish desserts and culinary disasters (Andrew forgetting to put the oven on was hilarious) it also gave us a real character in Selasi (to cool to put into words) contestants who were easy to root for in Andrew and Benjamina and my personal favourite, pout-queen Candice Brown (too sweet for words – simply adored her!). This series was the perfect send off to a teatime treat of a show.

6. Legends of Tomorrow (Season 1 Part 2/Season 2 Part 1) The Arrow/Flash spinoff took a few episodes to get going in 2015, but it blew it out of the park in 2016 and surpassed both its parent shows (I sense a pattern emerging – expect Supergirl to be high on this list next year!). The first season gave us a thrilling climax as the team contended with the time masters and Vandal Savage, and the second gave us one of the best supervillain team ups in history as Malcolm Merlyn, the Reverse Flash and Damien Darhk joined forces (Legion of Doom!!!) It also has some of the most colourful characters from the Arrowverse in anti-heroes Snart and Mick (Captain Cold and Heatwave), Captain Rip played by Rory from Doctor Who!! (usually amusingly muttering ‘oh bloody hell…’ as the teams plans fall apart every week) and Sara/White Canary, who continues to be one of my favourite superhero characters (who else can seduce both the Queen of France and girls in Salem in the same episode? Her becoming temporary captain also really gave her character some great material this year. A very silly superhero show, but isn’t that just what we need after 2016?

5. Black Mirror (Series 3) The first of 3 Netflix series in my top 5, Black Mirror’s move from channel 4 to Netflix looks increasingly inspired. Not only has it got rid of ad-breaks and freed up the episodes running time, but increasing the series length to 6 episodes seems to have improved the quality rather than detracted from it. Even weaker episodes like ‘Playtest’ are still worth watching, while there’s some classically dark instalments with clever stings in the tail like ‘Shut Up and Dance’, for those who want more of what series 1 and 2 gave us, as well as new concepts and episode formats. The highlight for me, has to be ‘San Junipero’, sad and heartwarming in equal measure and a very neat sci-fi idea. Overall though, its a sublime run of episodes and well worth your time.

4. Game of Thrones (Season 6) Thrones might not have had a particularly consistent run of episodes (a real slow-burner mid-season with a bit too much padding, particularly in the Arya and King’s Landing storylines) but who cares when it still gave us exactly what we wanted in a kick-ass and explosive finale, a scintillating clash between Jon Snow and Ramsay, Daenerys being awesome for the first time in a while and the sheer horror of the white walkers attack leading to the tearjerking ‘Hold the Door’ moment. If season 7 can keep up the work of episodes like ‘Home’, ‘Battle of the Bastards’ or ‘The Winds of Winter’, then we’re sitting pretty for a thrilling penultimate series.

3. Orange is the New Black (Season 4) Orange is the New Black has got stronger every season and the fourth series doesn’t buck the trend. Despite being arguably one of the darkest series we’ve had from the scriptwriters, it balanced comedy and tragedy as effectively as ever. Any series that combines tear-jerking mental health plotlines and that horrifying twist at the end of episode 12 with laugh out loud moments such as the unlikeliest threesome probably ever seen on TV (I won’t spoil it, its so much better if you aren’t expecting it) is clearly onto a winner. Well done OITNB, yet again you’ve been one of the Netflix highlights this year. Just not as good as…

2. House of Cards (Season 4) After a mixed third season, House of Cards turned things around and delivered what may be its best season so far. Kevin Spacey and Robin Wright’s acting was first class as always, but this time the writing was on par with their performances as the shows version of the US presidential election provided great drama and plenty of shock narrative twists. The way they utilised characters from previous seasons like ex-president Walker, Lucas Goodwin and Raymond Tusk was both expertly done and a real treat for long-term fans. I’ll credit them for not simply caricaturing Trump and Clinton either, instead giving us Joel Kinnaman’s Republican candidate Will Conway who seems like the ideal potential president, but has weaknesses/flaws that become apparent over the season, and was a far more engaging type of figure for Francis to face off with as he was continually at a PR disadvantage. Bring on season 5!

1.The Americans (Season 4) The most consistent series on television was a stand-out this year as the Russian spy pair/American married couple dealt with more problems than ever before as their lives increasingly teetered on the edge of unravelling. Dylan Baker was the stand-out guest star as a Soviet sympathiser working in an American viral lab, while the main cast was as great as ever, particularly Matthew Rhys, Keri Russell, Frank Langella and Alison Wright. The Jennings had to deal with their daughter’s struggle to accept their true identity, the loss of one of their closest informants and missions they worth becoming increasingly uncomfortable with. A slightly lacklustre season finale aside, it was a flawless run with several shock character exits and plot twists, can’t wait for the final two seasons of this thrilling if slow-burning drama.

Missing out on the list was Arrow (still rebuilding after a so-so year), Flash (ditto, Zoom was the most disappointing villain I’ve seen from DC’s TV universe), Red Dwarf (promising but not back to its best yet) and Jessica Jones (too much padding). There are some shows I haven’t got round to watching yet (Supergirl and Westworld for example) and some I just don’t watch (like Walking Dead).

As for the disappointments of the year, my worst offenders have to be the Chris Evans Top Gear (for obvious reasons – what a TWAT!), Doctor Who spin-off Class (very pointless – even Torchwood Series 1 was less awkward) and Luke Cage, which completely wasted its potential and contrived to make sure whichever style of show you like, you would hate half the season. (Congrats Marvel, you have made something worse than Agents of Shield… can’t you just give us Jessica Jones season 2 already?!)

My TV Awards 2016

Best Actor: Matthew Rhys (The Americans)
Best Actress: Krysten Ritter (Jessica Jones)/Robin Wright (House of Cards)
Best Supporting Actor: David Tennant (Jessica Jones)
Best Supporting Actress: Lori Petty (Orange is the New Black)
Best Episode: The Winds of Winter (Game of Thrones)
Best Hero: Sara Lance (Legends of Tomorrow)
Best Villain: Ramsay Snow (Game of Thrones)
Best Scripting: The Americans
Best Direction: Black Mirror
Best Soundtrack: Game of Thrones

If you’ve got your own list or disagree with mine, feel free to comment below. Happy New Year!

My Top TV shows of 2015

Everyone else on review sites does a top 10 this time of year, I don’t watch enough shows to do that justice, so here’s my top 5. If your favourite shows like Downton Abbey or the Walking Dead aren’t on here, its probably because I haven’t watched them.

If I’d done this last year for TV in 2014, the order would have been 5: Homeland Season 4, 4: House of Cards Season 2, 3: Game of Thrones Season 4, 2: Doctor Who Series 8, 1: Arrow Season 2. What a difference a year makes…

I’ve tried to avoid spoilers, but there might be some minor ones in here (only minor plot details though, no character deaths have been mentioned) so warning: Minor Spoilers.

5. Orange is the New Black Season 3: While House of Cards is normally my Netflix go-to, Orange is the New Black’s third season was everything I wanted from the show, while House of Cards made a couple of small missteps that means it isn’t on my list this year. Dispensing with the villain driven plotline from season 2 (much to my relief as that got a bit wearing) it refocused on Piper and Alex, while throwing new character Stella (Ruby Rose) into the mix to create a love-triangle (though a more interesting one than Larry-Piper-Alex was in season 1). Background characters like Caputo, Nora and Pennsatucky really came to the fore this season, while we got some hilarious plotlines like Piper setting up a covert used panty business for online weirdos and Crazy Eyes writing sci-fi based erotica that becomes a hit amongst the prisoners and some of the guards. Can’t wait for season 4!

4. Game of Thrones Season 5: It might have been Thrones weakest season since season 2, but people were unduly harsh on Season 5. Based on two of the slowest books in the saga (including Feast of Crows, which is almost indisputably the worst GOT book), it did (in my view) a fine job of condensing two novels into 10 episodes, and gave us the stunning Hardhome battle sequence in the bargain. The Jon Snow storyline never put a foot wrong, Tyrion and Daenerys meeting was a delight, while Stannis and Sansa’s storylines contained some surprises even book readers weren’t prepared for. Yes the sand snakes were disappointing and Arya’s storyline didn’t really go anywhere, but overall I liked this season, even if it wasn’t the show at its best.

3. The Americans Season 3: Arguably the most consistent show on TV, it’s hard to name a bad episode of spy drama the Americans. For those of you unaware it focuses in on two soviet spies who have integrated into US society in the 1980’s, whose neighbours, co-workers and kids are unaware of their true nature. Matthew Rhys and Keri Russell are excellent as the couple in question, who have to wrestle with several new problems this season: the prospect of revealing their true identities to their increasingly suspicious teenage daughter Paige, one of their informants realising their identity, Elizabeth (Russell) being told her mother back in Russia is dying and Philip (Rhys) grappling with an assignment to seduce the teenage daughter of a CIA director, which he is in no way comfortable doing. Its a very morally grey show (as you are essentially rooting for the bad guys even if they believe what they are doing is right) that continues to please.

2. The Flash (Season 1, Part 2/Season 2 Part 1): Overshadowing its parent show in its first year? Impressive. Yes Arrow was suffering from its weakest series (though it has since improved), but Flash blew it out of the water, and has been the better of the two throughout two half series late this year as well. It’s core cast of Barry, Cisco, Joe and Caitlin work exceedingly well together, and while it was touch and go for a while season 2 has managed to prevent Iris becoming another Laurel and has massively improved her character. It’s had some great villains (which Arrow was lacking till Damien Darhk showed up) backed some terrific performances from Tom Cavanagh (Harrison Wells), Wentworth Miller (Captain Cold), Liam McIntyre (Weather Wizard) and best of all, Mark Hamill (The Trickster). Can’t wait till it restarts in January.

1. Doctor Who Series 9: Out of the 9 shows that were in contention for this list, this is the only British one, and I was glad to see how well it did this year. The best series of the show since its revival (and hence possibly its strongest ever) series 9 had no misfires and a marvellous 3 part finale, including Heaven Sent, which may just be one of the best episodes in the series 52 year history. For every episode, I know someone who would argue it was the highlight of the series (or at least the 2nd best after Heaven Sent!). Capaldi and Coleman were fabulous throughout, with the various directors, showrunner Moffat and composer Murray Gold all delivering as well. As for guest stars, the highlight has to be Maisie Williams. I’ve devoted a few articles to this show so I won’t go into too much more detail, but for me, series 9 was an absolute knockout!

Honourable mentions go to House of Cards, Arrow, Gotham and Homeland, which all narrowly missed out, though I enjoyed watching all of them.

I won’t do a top 5 films (I haven’t seen enough of them this year to really judge) though Force Awakens, Mockingjay Part 2, Spectre, Jurassic World and Ant-Man would have all been in contention. I might do a top 5 games, I’ll see how easy it is to write one.