Tag Archives: PS4

10 Things to watch out for in 2019

Before I get to my traditional ‘Best of Year’ articles, I thought i’d take some time to do a preview of the likely hits that 2019 might give us. While this type of article is pretty common for this time of year, I’ve never done one before, but I thought I’d try my hand at it. So without further ado, here’s my pick of what films, TV and gaming to watch out for in 2019.

1.Game of Thrones, Final Season: Season 7 really upped the scale of events in Thrones and gave us cinematic battle sequences and long-awaited character interactions into the bargain. Now Season 8 has 6 hour-plus long episodes to wrap everything up. With the White Walkers finally past the wall, expect huge scale battles and significant character deaths. However it ends, its sure to be unmissable television.

2. Avengers: Endgame: Infinity War broke all kinds of records and finally, FINALLY delivered a truly great villain for the MCU. That said, it wasn’t a flawless film, even if it was extremely entertaining. But it set the stage for this: the final Avengers film (at least for this group of Avengers). With a high probably that Iron Man and Captain America will either die or bow out at the conclusion, this might finally be the Marvel film where there are actual consequences. But whatever the fate of the heroes, its another 3 hours (supposedly) of Thanos, and that alone makes it worth seeing.

3. Captain Marvel: Marvel finally gives us a female-superhero movie. Brie Larson certainly looks the part, and the trailer really gives you a sense that there’s some ambition in this one. Expect it to lead straight into Avengers: Endgame too. Throw in a significant role for Samuel L. Jackson, and this could be Marvel’s best origin story since X-Men: First Class. Its only real hurdle is it has to live up to Wonder Woman. Speaking of which…

4. Wonder Woman 1984: One of the two good Worlds of DC films (aside from Man of Steel) finally gets a sequel. With iconic Wonder Woman foe cheetah and a no-doubt rousing soundtrack from Hans Zimmer, this might finally be the film where DC turns the tide. Or it could be the final nail in its coffin if DC screw it up. Either way, its Wonder Woman, so you know its worth a shot.

5. The Last of Us, Part 2: After the first Last of Us and the Uncharted Games, expectations are sky-high for this PS4 exclusive next year. Not only does Naughty Dog have a great track record, but the first game is still one of the best we’ve had this decade. With the same mix of epic storytelling and zombie survival horror, I’ve got very high hopes for this one.

6. The Outer Worlds: Made by Obsidian, this looks like it could be the Dark Horse of gaming releases in 2019. Not only is it the product of the brains behind Fallout: New Vegas (AKA one of the best Fallout games) but it looks like a mash-up between Borderlands and Fallout. That can only be a good thing. We haven’t have a good sci-fi RPG since Mass Effect 3 came out.

7. Stranger Things, Season 3: With House of Cards finished, most Marvel shows cancelled and Orange is the New Black drawing to a close, Stranger Things is kind of Netflix’s last standout show. Its also the best Sci-Fi show on television right now (admittedly not hard when its up against Star Trek: Discovery and Chibnall’s bastard version of Who) with one of the best young casts in television and superb support from Veteran actors such as Winona Ryder and David Harbour. With an incredibly catchy theme, a great soundtrack and brilliant special effects, you’d be mad to miss it.

8. Metro: Exodus: Since there is suddenly an unexpected market for a decent post-apocalyptic RPG game, Metro: Exodus seems likely to do very well next year. The Metro series has always had an interesting story, set in the tunnels underneath a nuclear devastated Russia, it had a pretty unique tone and feel. With Exodus its third and easily most ambitious entry, this not only looks set to pick up many disaffected Fallout fans, but also has little competition in the February release window. I’d put money on it doing quite well so long as they don’t botch the release (looking at you Bethesda).

9. Orange is the New Black, Final Season: Netflix’s longest running hit finally comes to a close in 2019. While the last few seasons have been divisive, I’ve loved them, and I’ll be sad to see it go. With several characters fates up in the air after S6, it’ll be interesting to see how they wrap it all up. With the usual mix of comedy, drama and heartache, i’m sure it’ll be a memorable ride.

10. Star Wars, Episode IX: After the critically successful but audience divisive Force Awakens and Last Jedi, Disney has a fight on its hands to bring the Star Wars fanbase back into balance. With yet another film which had to change director halfway through (this time bringing back J.J. Abrams to replace Colin Trevorrow) we know very little about how this will go. Will it be a Rogue-One-esque triumph? A Force-Awakens style remake of Return of the Jedi with plenty of style but no substance? An innovative yet divisive entry that keeps fans guessing like Last Jedi? (yeah right, this is Abrams. The guy hasn’t had an original idea ever aside from how to overuse lens-flares). Or will it be irrelevant and will audiences just stay home like they did for Solo? Wherever it ends up, it will either be the end of an era or the moment the Star Wars franchise goes back on hiatus. So either way, its going to be an unmissable end to 2019!

The three things I’m most hyped for at this point have to be The Last of Us Part 2, Avengers: Endgame and Stranger Things S3, but who knows – one of the others may pleasantly surprise me and outdo all my expectations. Either way – 2019 is definitely looking good in the entertainment industry (which is reassuring, since the outlook is dire everywhere else!).

Next Up: My look at the best and worst films that have released in 2018, with TV and Video Game articles close behind…

Assassin’s Creed Origins Review

No story spoilers except for setting/time period.

Assassin’s Creed has often struggled to find its identity as a series in the last few years. The first few games all felt like natural successors to each other, and generally AC2, Brotherhood and Revelations either matched or improved upon their immediate predecessors. Then the series lost its way somewhat, which was a bit predictable, given that Revelations wrote out Ezio and Altair, the two most popular playable characters in the series, and Desmond Miles and Warren Vidic, the last two links to the first game, both exited in AC3.

That’s not to say the intervening games haven’t had their plus points. AC3 started the trend of having more open-world style areas, Black Flag and Freedom Cry gave us a delightful ship combat system, Rogue’s story is often praised as one of the best in the series and Syndicate’s Jacob and Evie were highlighted in reviews as the first memorable main characters since Ezio. But none of those games were perfect – the combat system often felt dated, games became increasingly buggy on release, the modern day story got increasingly hard to care about post-Desmond, and the settings just weren’t as interesting as the Crusades or renaissance Italy or Constantinople (I mean, was anyone crying out for games set in the American or French revolutions? I’ve never spoken to anyone who particularly wanted an Assassin’s Creed game in those eras).

With Assassin’s Creed: Origins, the series may finally have found its groove again.

Ptolemaic Egypt is a setting that deserves the current gen’s graphics, and boy, is the game world absolutely stunning. This is somewhere you will never get tired of exploring, and whether you’re exploring Alexandria, crossing the desert or sailing up the Nile, you’ll always be aware of how beautifully rendered everything is – and you’ll end up using the game’s photo mode a fair bit, let me tell you. It’s day/night cycle really makes a tangible difference to how the world feels, in a way only games like Horizon: Zero Dawn have done previously. Its a completely open world experience too, and while you’ll have an occasional moment where the game pauses to load the next area, its mostly pretty seamless at having you move around the map. Fast travel is available too, which helps a lot, although you have a lot of different transport options available (including horses, camels, ships and chariots).

The game’s playable characters are also a lot more memorable than in previous entries. You’ll spend most of your time playing as Bayek, the last of the Medjay, who’s a protector of the common folk but has a winning personality as well, and whose responses always seem human and believable – his outrage at atrocities, his snide dislike for corrupt officials, his sympathy for downtrodden peasants, it all seems natural and relatable. Bayek’s status as a Egyptian comes in play a lot, as he sees his country and people suffering a lot on account of their inferior status to Greeks, not to mention their vulnerability to the Romans, who are starting to encroach on Egyptian territory. You also get several levels as Bayek’s wife Aya, who’s equally compelling if not quite as likeable, as the two of them are caught between pursuing a revenge quest and trying to free Egypt from the grip of a civil war between Cleopatra and Ptolemy. The modern day stuff is kept to a minimum, but in Layla, we finally have a modern-day character who seems interesting enough to care about, even though she’s only on screen for 20 or so minutes.

The gameplay has also between heavily revamped to have a more RPG feel to things – there’s still a wide variety of weaponry available (spears, swords, axes, sceptres etc.) as well as four varieties of bows all tailored to different scenarios (hunting, stealth kills, boss fights, rapid fire etc.) which gives you a lot of scope for how you approach combat scenarios. There’s now a levelling system with numerous perks you can use to upgrade Bayek (providing him with poison darts, fire bombs and other tools, increasing his proficiency in combat or improving archery skills) and you can pretty much build his skillset as suits you. You gain XP for kills and completing missions, of which there are a multitude. In additional to the dozen or so main quests, which are fairly long and take you all over the map, there are around a hundred or so side quests, which usually involve you rescuing locals, clearing out bandit camps, dealing with animal attacks, evading Ptolemy’s soldiers or exploring tombs.

There’s a lot to do in this game in general – most tombs and camps have treasure for you to loot or captains to assassinate, and there are loads of them dotted around the map. There’s a fair amount of cities and towns too, most of which have a unique feel and plenty of inhabitants to interact with. You can become a gladiator in the arenas in Cyrene or Krokodilopolis, or a chariot racer in Alexandria. There’s a lot of sunken ships around the Nile for you to scavenge too. In short, you’ll never run out of things to do in this game – there’s almost too much of it to be honest.

Further embracing the RPG side of things, the game has a new game plus mode and an option that will scale lower level enemies to your level, if either of those things interest you. Origins also introduces variable difficulty into the series, with the standard game options of easy, normal, hard and nightmare which seem near universal at this point. Normal still presents a reasonable challenge, though it doesn’t require the precision of God of War on normal and is hardly comparable to RPG’s like Dark Souls. There’s a large variety of enemies: Human enemies are a mix of archers, spearman, standard soldiers, Brutes (heavy weapons), Elites (with shields) and bosses. There are also various animals to contend with, including Crocodiles (who are a much larger threat in water, obviously), Hippos (engage at range), hyenas (troublesome in packs), lions (surprisingly easy) and, rarely, a war elephant (these fuckers are VERY tough). Most annoying are snakes, who tend to lurk in the dark corners of tombs or caves, or worse, inside destroyable pots, and thus you often don’t see them until you run straight into them (which as snakes kill Bayek in 3-4 hits can be very irritating). Ultimately, whether you want a challenge or a stress-free run, there’ll be a difficulty setting that works for you.

The crafting system is crucial but easy to get to grips with, as you gather various metals, leathers, wood and animal skins, which can upgrade Bayek’s health, damage and the amount of equipment and arrows he can carry. Fortunately, gathering these materials is rarely a chore, as there’s only six main varieties of them, some of which can be looted from convoys of soldiers, others you can find from hunting animals or from scrapping weaponry, and if worst comes to worst, you can take a perk which allows you to purchase extra materials at shops. The currency system is more of a challenge than previous games – Bayek won’t be drowning in cash the way Ezio was, and will need to loot tombs and camps and sell old equipment a lot to have enough to buy new outfits and upgrade his weapons.

So all in all, pretty positive? Yeah, there’s one or two downsides: the game’s plot meanders a bit too much at times, not all the side quests are that interesting (some areas are definitely more fun than others) and shield combat isn’t done all that well, but overall, its such an improvement over its predecessors that I have to give it a rating of…

4.5 out of 5. Not perfect, but getting there.

Assassin’s Creed Odyssey seems to be leaning even further into RPG elements (choice of main character, romance options etc.) and refining combat even further to fit ancient Greece. Fingers crossed it will be as compelling as Egypt. But for the first time in a long time, I’m actually looking forward to what the Assassin’s Creed team is working on, and that’s largely thanks to how well they’ve turned things around with origins.

God of War (2018) Review

This one is something special.

Minor Story Spoilers – but only in terms of setting/characters, not plotline.

It’s been a while since a new PS4 game has truly gripped me. While COD: WWII and Batman: Enemy Within have kept me busy, I haven’t been blown away by anything new since Horizon Zero Dawn released last year. Until now.

This has a very different style from previous God of War games. Its more character driven, with more RPG elements and a much more open world than previous instalments. Kratos is a much more nuanced character here – in previous games he’s been defined solely by vengeance and tragedy, here he gets some slow but merited character growth. This is mainly because of his son, Atreus, who serves as Kratos’ companion and protégée throughout the game. Another change is that Kratos’ main weapon is now the Leviathan Axe, which works in a similar way to Thor’s Hammer (Kratos can recall it at will after throwing it) apart from the fact its abilities are Ice based rather than lightning based. Fans of previous games needn’t worry however, as Kratos’ Blades of Chaos do become available as an alternate weapon a third of the way through the game, which adds a bit of variety to combat. The biggest change however, is the move from Greek myth to Norse myth, which, if anything, proves far more interesting than the Greek. Kratos isn’t taking on the whole pantheon of Norse Gods here, but a few of them crash proceedings to make his task more difficult. The Norse idea of ‘Nine Realms’ is faithfully portrayed and engaging brought to life, along with many, many figures and monsters from Norse mythology.

Combat has also been significantly revamped, mainly because the third person camera is now much more tightly focused on Kratos, rendering him more vulnerable to flank attacks but giving you much better control of his own attacks. While combos still play a big part, it feels like a cross between Skyrim-esque hack and slash and the switch it up style of Arkham games – but is arguably far better than either. There are a wide variety of skill upgrades available which unlock more combos and increase damage, paid for by XP (given for defeating enemies and finishing quests). XP is also used to upgrade various Runes which Kratos can apply to his and Atreus’ weapons, which allow very powerful rune attacks and spirit summons that can only be used after lengthy cooldowns. Atreus’ bow and choke attacks are also upgradeable, and can prove very helpful in tough battles. There isn’t a levelling system as such, instead certain areas are locked off until you progress to a certain part of the story or receive a particular upgrade, usually preventing you from running into enemies that are far too strong for you (marked by a purple health bar). You are free to explore most of the map pretty quickly, but its advisable to get very good skills and gear before you even think of taking on Valkyries or other really strong enemies, who usually lurk in hidden, underground chambers.

The map size is significantly large, encompassing a sizeable part of Midgard (Earth) as well as Helheim (Realm of the Dead), Muspelheim (Realm of Fire) and various other realms from Norse mythology, all of which have a unique feel to them – and all of which look absolutely stunning. I don’t normally go for many screenshots or use photo modes while playing games, but God of War is absolutely beautifully rendered – even on my standard model PS4. I can’t think of a better looking game I’ve played. The soundtrack serves its purpose but only stands out in a few places – most of the time spent travelling instead uses background conversations between Kratos and Atreus which underpins their burgeoning  relationship and provides insight to the Mythology and History of the world they inhabit.

Aside from the main story, which I won’t spoil, there are numerous side quests from two dwarves called Brok and Sindri, who serve as the games’ shopkeepers and blacksmiths, who buy, sell and upgrade all of Kratos and Atreus equipment, in addition to the many collectibles which can be found in hidden chests or areas throughout the maps. There’s just so much to do in the 20-40 hours of gameplay, ranging from freeing imprisoned Dragons, to killing Odin’s Ravens, to defeating combat challenges in Muspelheim and solving puzzles to unlock Nornir chests and improve Kratos’ health and rage. To be honest though, exploring the map is such fun it doesn’t matter if its for a quest or just for the sake of exploring – its compelling either way – though I recommend you play through the main quest pretty frequently, as this unlocks more areas and gives you more XP than other activities (don’t worry – you can keep playing post main quest so it doesn’t matter what order you do things in).

Kratos and Atreus never feel overpowered, mainly due to the wide variety of enemies, including reavers, draugr, wolves, dark elves, trolls, werewolves, Valkyries, stone ancients and bosses, which include everything from giants to dragons to Norse Gods. This variety, added to the multitude of combos and rune attacks prevent combat ever getting repetitive or stale (the same tactics don’t work on every enemy – werewolves dodge too often for axe throws to be effective, frozen enemies are sometimes immune to axe attacks etc.). You have to switch things up a fair bit, particularly when completing challenges in Muspelheim or fighting Valkyries, who are a real challenge even on Normal difficulty.

The one thing I will say about the story is that it offers one of the most compelling Father-Son dynamics I’ve seen in gaming. Atreus and Kratos both have their flaws, but make interesting protagonists. The game does very much feels like a ‘part 1’ of their story, which can only be a good thing. Whether the Norse setting lasts 2 games or 3, I have a feeling that Ragnarok isn’t far away…

Overall God of War is the best game I’ve played on PS4. It balances difficulty, fun, story and gameplay exceeding well. I wouldn’t say its my all time favourite, but it probably is the best designed game I own. If you have a PS4, you need to get this. If you don’t have a PS4, buy one – because missing out on games this good is not an option. Who needs Elder Scrolls VI when you have this?

Rating: 5 out of 5!

Seriously people, just look at the exclusives Sony has at the moment. God of War, the Uncharted series, Horizon Zero Dawn, The Last of Us AND upcoming games like Spider-man? There is nothing on Xbox One or Nintendo Switch that even matches one of those games, let alone all of them. I get arguments about brand loyalty, price and controller layout, but the amount of quality games you can’t get without a PS4 isn’t even funny anymore. If you’re a gamer and have the cash, get one!

Article: Why Modern Warfare 2 needs a full remaster!

There’s been a lot of rumours recently about a possible Modern Warfare 2 remaster coming out this year or next year. After the remaster of the original Modern Warfare, this doesn’t seem that unlikely, given that COD’s current run of games are becoming more and more derided by the fanbase, and the Modern Warfare series was a high point for many.

The Call of Duty franchise is arguably lacking direction at the moment. Infinite Warfare was widely condemned as the wrong approach for the series (it’s not Halo and it never should be) and while Ghosts, Advanced Warfare and Black Ops III all had some plus points, none came close to matching the best COD games (virtually every gamer I know who plays the series would pick an entry between World at War and Modern Warfare 2 as the series highlight). WW2 was sighted as a return to form, but let’s face it, that game only happened because of how well Battlefield 1 was received, and COD jumped on the bandwagon and decided to return to conflicts set in the past. I doubt anyone’s particularly excited about Black Ops 4 either, given that neither of the last two Black Ops games have come close to matching the original. The studios seem to have lost the sense of what the fanbase wants from new titles. The Modern Warfare remaster, on the other hand, was very well received (at least, it was once fans could buy it separately and not in a bundle with Infinite Warfare), so it feels natural that the COD studios will want to cash in on a nostalgic desire for its most successful games. I wouldn’t be surprised if a Black Ops or World at War remaster happens at some point either. But, arguably, Modern Warfare 2 is the obvious candidate for a remaster, as, for me at least, its the apex of the COD series.

I say this because its one of the only games in the series where all three parts of the game were great. The campaign may not be as iconic as the first Modern Warfare’s, but I found it equally fun and very intense in places. Who can forget the chase through militia infested favelas, storming a Russian gulag or fighting your way through a burning White House? The controversial ‘No Russian’ level aside, there’s barely a duff moment to be found in the campaign, and the shock betrayal from the Loose Ends mission is surely one of the most memorable twists in any COD game. Hans Zimmer’s rousing soundtrack stands out from the blander, by-the-numbers scores of both previous and future entries and doubles down on the intensity of both the action sequences and cutscenes. Spec Ops mode is great too, and genuinely challenging in places (normally whenever Juggernauts are present) and features a great variety of wave defence, snowmobile races, and assault missions.

Now we come to the elephant in the room. The most recent rumours about a possible remaster suggest that the remastered version will only include single-player, not multiplayer. THIS IS FUCKING POINTLESS!!! As good as the campaign is, why would you buy a £20 remaster just for that? I don’t know about you guys, but as long as your ps3 or Xbox 360 or PC still works, why spend money just to get extra graphics for something you can already replay at leisure? Even if Spec Ops is included, you could still replay missions whenever you want on your old console or save files. Most people only buy remasters for 3 reasons: 1. They never had the original game in the first place; 2. They didn’t have DLC that comes with the remaster; 3. The remastered version fixes bugs or other issues or simply performs better than the original.

Modern Warfare 2’s singleplayer was never buggy or had any issues with save files. There’s no singleplayer DLC for either the campaign or spec ops. The only reason you’d want a remaster of this game is because the one thing that no longer works on the original is the multiplayer, because the servers are largely empty and any game you can find is normally overrun by hackers who’ve turned off the gravity or made numerous other annoying glitches. If the remaster is single-player only, no one needs to buy it. No one except people who never tried the original, but they’ll probably prefer a new game that has multiplayer included anyway.

This is a real pity, because Modern Warfare’s 2 multiplayer is arguably one of the best in the series. The maps are near-universally good (There’s one or two exceptions: Underpass isn’t great and the DLC map packs aren’t worthwhile). Between Skidrow, Derail, Wasteland, Quarry, Favela, Terminal and all the others, there was something for everyone. The game modes all had their moments; Demolition, Search and Destroy and even Sabotage offered different challenges that were worth trying out whenever you got bored of the Deathmatches or Domination, while the Hardcore game modes really ramped up the intensity if you were feeling brave. Okay, yes, there were a few pointless perks and the Noobtubers were irritating as hell on some maps, but the killstreaks seemed balanced (I always loved shooting down helicopters the instant someone called them in) and almost all playstyles were viable, whether you used Sniper rifles, SMG’s, shotguns or Assault Rifles. While I know Black Ops’ multiplayer has its fans, for me, none of the CODs after MW2 managed to match its multiplayer for sheer fun (I rarely play multiplayer – this is one of only 3 games where I’ve really gotten into it, which speaks volumes about how addictive it was).

So to sum up: I hope that the rumoured remaster really is on the way. But only if it has multiplayer. If it doesn’t, this is the stupidest decision in gaming since Battlefront 2’s progression system/loot boxes. It would be that much of a let-down. And one I (and many, many others) would never forgive the Call of Duty series for.

Skyrim Special Edition Review

As PSN had it on sale, I finally decided to get the upgrade and re-purchase Skyrim for PS4. Was it worth it? In short… hell yes.

The original Skyrim had several major problems bugging it. The loading screen times were unacceptably long (particularly once you got past Level 30), the save files took up a ridiculous amount of room, and the game was prone to crashing when trying to save or load at high levels. This got so frustrating I finally threw out the PS3 version earlier in the year, as I was wasting 10 mins on loading screens for every hour of gameplay once my character had got up to level 40. Not the case anymore.

The Special edition fixes the loading screen problem completely. The longest I’ve had to wait so far was about 10 seconds, and this makes the game a lot less frustrating. The number of glitches is down as well (noticed two minor glitches and had one crash by level 26, which is a vast improvement on the original). The quicksave feature also helps speed up gameplay, while the game no longer risks crashing everytime it tries to autosave. The PS4’s vast memory also means the large save-file size is no longer an issue.

In short, the Special Edition fixes 95% of the original games problems. It also gives the graphics a welcome upgrade – the game always looked good, but the landscape almost feels real now in a way it didn’t before. The light and shadow effects are something truly special, especially the way that sunbeams and moonlight visually change the light level outdoors. Water, plantlife and weather look more realistic too, while sunrise and sunsets are truly beautiful. One side effect of the improved graphics is that character creation is now actually worth your time – (Argonians, Elves and Khajiit are now far more worth customising than previously, and you can see the effect minor changes make much more easily). Previously you could be done making a good-looking character in 1 minute, now you can take 5-10 to perfect all the details (or 20-30 mins if you’re like my friend Molly 😉 The new version also adds full mod support if that’s your thing.

The Special edition also comes with all 3 bits of DLC attached (Hearthfire, Dawnguard and Dragonborn), so if you never brought those its definitely worth the upgrade. For those who don’t know, Hearthfire allows you to build your own houses/manors, adopt children and, most crucially, helps you level up that Smithing skill really easily! While it’s a fun addition, the other two expansions are far more worthwhile. Dawnguard introduces two new factions: the Dawnguard, an order of vampire hunters armed with Crossbows, tough armour and a few armoured trolls, and the Vampire Lords, ancient vampires (with some really irritating drain health spells) and their minions (mindless thralls, Death Hounds and living Gargoyles). If you side with the vampires you gain Vampirism and the attached strengths and weaknesses (immunity to poison and disease, weakness to fire, improved powers, no health/magicka/stamina regen in sunlight), including most notably the Vampire Lord form, which features a truly brutal drain health spell and complements mages extremely well. Dawnguard also makes the Werewolf much more useful, as the new Werewolf perk tree allows you to make your bestial form much more powerful for every human you slay and feed on (a must for anyone doing the Companions Questline!). Dragonborn adds an entirely new area to explore (the Island of Solstheim), new enemies and a boss fight with Miraak, the original/first Dragonborn. Oh, and the ability to tame and ride dragons.

To sum up, the Special Edition fixes a lot of problems and really beefs up the graphics, but adds little in terms of gameplay. However, if you never brought the DLC for your previous gen version, would like to try out some mods or are just sick of frequent crashes and slow loading screens, get the upgrade. Just maybe wait till its on sale on PSN or Xbox Live. It’s worth a £20 spend, not the full price £35 it came out for.

Rating: 4 out of 5 (A worthwhile if overpriced upgrade)

I’m in a gaming mood atm, so expect reviews of Injustice 2, Horizon Zero Dawn, Assassin’s Creed Origins and Star Wars: Battlefront 2 over the next month, though I will find time for Thor Ragnarok and Justice League as well.