Tag Archives: Netflix

Orange is the New Black Season 6 Review

Starring Taylor Schilling, Natasha Lyonne, Danielle Brooks, Selenis Leyva, Nick Sandow and Kate Mulgrew.

Warning: Minor Plot Spoilers follow for Season 6. Major Spoilers for Season 5.

Season 5 got mixed reviews. I personally loved it, but I can see why some thought it got too fan-service-y in places. Even it detractors have to admit the riot made for compelling viewing. But there were always going to be consequences. The first half of S6 is all about those consequences, and the two key themes of the season are betrayal and redemption.

The opening episodes see the feds out to pin the blame for both the riot and Humphrey and Piscatella’s deaths on at least 5 of the inmates, which leads to a lot of backstabbing and mud-slinging as the various inmates try to save themselves or settle old scores. Some betrayals you really won’t see coming, others are what season 5 was all building up to. The remaining episodes deal with the consequences, as the inmates in question seek revenge, struggle with guilt or fear retribution.

While most of the regulars are back this season, a lot of familiar faces are missing (because they were put in a different prison, while we follow the ones sent to Litchfield Max). Characters like Big Boo and Helen get mere cameos, while ones like Watson, Norma and Chang are entirely absent. A third of the guards from last season are gone too, though Dixon, Luschek, Donuts and McCullough are all back to some extent.

There are various new characters too, both prisoners and guards, some of whom are more memorable than others. The main plot of the season sees the inmates caught up in the tension between C-block and D-block in Maximum Security, driven by a long-standing feud between sisters Carol and Barbara, who are the two major players in Max. Other newbies include their enforcers, Badison (who might just be the nastiest piece of work OITNB has given us) and Daddy (who strikes up a surprisingly sweet relationship with one of the series regulars). The new guards are similarly hit-and-miss, but chief Hopper, Luschek and McCullough’s arcs make up for the less interesting ones.

Things feel a lot more tense this season – the very nature of Max has you constantly worried that someone is about to get shivved or beaten up (both of which happen) while some of the guards are beyond brutal in how they treat Daya and the riot leaders. Orange is the New Black has always been good at mixing humour and drama with the darker side of prison life, and that balance remains as compelling as ever here. If had to criticise, the central conflict between the blocks peters out a bit too much, and there’s no shocks here up there with Poussey or Piscatella’s deaths, but the season as a whole is still pretty great viewing regardless.

The humour is still on point, with highlights including Flaca and Black Cindy teaming up as the new prison radio hosts and Suzanne and Freida becoming cellmates. While most of the romance focus is on Piper and Alex, there are several other compelling pairings throughout the season (including a somewhat unlikely love triangle involving Luschek and two of the prisoners, as well as the conclusion of the Doggett/Donuts arc). Surprisingly the best pairing of the season is Caputo and Fig, who’s relationship plays a much bigger part in the story than you might expect.

Meanwhile it’s Red, Taystee, Daya and Ruiz who get the lion’s share of the drama side of things. The flashbacks remain mostly interesting – Freida’s is arguably the most important, though its Nicky and Cindy’s snapshots that will probably leave a lasting impression. The majority of flashbacks tend to focus on the new characters rather than existing ones, but this was pretty inevitable given the number of cast changes this season.

Overall, I wouldn’t say this is OITNB’s best season, but its a damn good one, even if the finale lacks the punch of recent seasons. Focusing in on a smaller section of the cast seemed to work well, but the quality of the newcomers varied. The show still remains the best Netflix has to offer though.

Rating: 4.5 out of 5

 

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Jessica Jones Season 2 Review

Starring Krysten Ritter, Rachael Taylor, Eka Darville, Carrie-Anne Moss and Janet McTreer.

Warning: Minor Spoilers Follow for Season 2 and Major Spoilers for Season 1

Jessica Jones is easily the most interesting of Marvel’s TV superheroes. Her first season was gripping in a way that Luke Cage and Iron Fist never came close to. Yes, it was three episodes too long (like almost ALL Marvel Netflix productions – even the 8-episode Defenders had that problem) but for the most part it was very engaging stuff, helped immeasurably by Krysten Ritter’s tortured ‘not-a-heroine’ Jessica and David Tennant’s chilling villain Kilgrave. The series 1 finale saw Jessica finally get the upper hand and snap Kilgrave’s neck, which begged one obvious question: how the hell do you follow David Tennant as a villain?

Season 2’s answer is to have multiple antagonists. Between dickhead lawyer Pryce (Terry Chen), fellow Metahuman Alisa (Janet McTreer) and scientist Karl (the one who gave Jessica her powers) there’s a lot of potential bad guys floating around. But, unlike the black and white films Marvel is so fond of, there’s a lot of grey here. Jessica, Trish and Hogarth all go to some pretty dark places this season, while none of the villains are the out-and-out monster Kilgrave was. This helps keep the season somewhat unpredictable, even if none of the new characters come close to being as memorable as Tennant.

Fortunately, even if the show can’t live up to season 1’s villain, it does fix a lot of that season’s other problems. The pacing, while slow for the first few episodes, never feels padded out in the way season 1 was. There’s actually 12-13 episodes worth of story to tell here, not 8-10 stretched out like was the case last time. The show also cuts out some of the slack from season 1 (Simpson’s role in events is minimal but effective, Hogarth’s storyline actually leads somewhere) and develops the supporting characters a lot more (Trish and Malcolm have very different season long journeys, while the Jessica who comes out of episode 13 is definitely not the one we see in episode 1). The show also gives Jessica a new love interest who is a really good replacement for Luke, which I wasn’t expecting. The various plot twists don’t derail things the way they scuppered Luke Cage’s last season either, even if the mid-season twist is equally cliché.

Its not all good: the first episode is pretty dreadful, the season’s arc takes a while to become clear and Hogarth’s storyline isn’t always engaging, but overall I think I actually preferred this to season 1. Even if Tennant’s involvement is minimal, the season is much better structured and the production, direction and writing are all pretty consistently strong from episode 2 onwards. If you like darker, more meaningful superhero shows that feature actual detective work and real consequences, Jessica Jones is still the only Marvel offering worth looking at… well unless you happen to find Daredevil interesting (I don’t but I know plenty of people do).

Rating: 4 out of 5 (I gave the first season 3.5/5)

Next up: My review of the second season of ‘A Series of Unfortunate Events’. Or Black Panther if I finally find time to see it.

Stranger Things: Season 2 Review

Starring Winona Ryder, David Harbour, Finn Wolfhard, Millie Bobby Brown, Sean Astin and Paul Reiser.

TV shows tend to hit their stride a bit more in their second season than they did in their first run. This is true for everything from Doctor Who to Arrow to The Grand Tour. This tends to be because showrunners have the chance to look at the first series and iron out any obvious issues that annoyed fans or critics the first time round. The only reason shows can tend to be worse in their second season is if there have been substantial cast changes or there wasn’t a good enough story arc/idea to merit a sequel in the first place. Stranger Things’ cast remained consistent from Series 1, so its continued success was always going to be down to whether the showrunners had a good, clear idea of what the show should do going forward. Good news – they absolutely did.

The show hits the ground running pretty quickly compared to season 1. While the first two episodes mainly serve as exercise in introducing new characters (such as Max [Sadie Sink], a love interest for Dustin and Lucas, and Joyce’s new boyfriend, played by Sean Astin aka Samwise Gamgee) and seeing how the land lies after the events of the season 1 finale (Mike still waiting for Eleven, Nancy’s guilt over Barbara’s death, Will suffering from PTSD etc.) things pick up pretty quickly from episode 3 onwards. The cliffhangers feel more meaningful this time, particularly the ones in episodes 6 and 8. Episode 6’s cliffhanger is exacerbated by the fact that you have to wait a whole chapter to see the resolution, since episode 7 purely focuses on Eleven’s journey (yet still remains extremely engaging). There’s less annoying character moments this time as well (apart from Mike being a dick to Max, though given how much Eleven’s disappearance and Will’s trauma put him through this season its understandable). Paul Reiser (aka Burke from Aliens) also joins the cast as a government doctor at Hawkins lab, and it is pleasingly unclear for most of the season what his true morals/motivations are.

The shows’ production remains largely faultless. The music fits perfectly. The direction and effects mesh together nicely. The dialogue is never clunky or cringeworthy. There are more humorous moments than in season one. Their are less genre-based clichés this time (the government agency isn’t wholly evil for once). The storyline is engaging. If it wasn’t for the fact that you can see where most of the character arcs are headed (i.e. Eleven’s decision at the end of chapter 7/which of Dustin or Lucas that Max will end up with) and the sense that most of the characters are too important for the show to kill off (Will is the only one of the young cast you ever feel is in real danger, ditto Steve amongst the young adults) I’d have no issues with this show at all. However, while the predictability is a shame, rather like in Game of Thrones season 7, you’ll be having too much fun to really care.

Overall Stranger Things 2 is an improvement on the first series in almost every regard. The new cast members slot in seamlessly, the music and direction remain a standout, and the season hits its stride much earlier than the first one did. Only its predictability prevents me giving this a perfect rating.

Rating: 4.5 out of 5

My next review will probably be Jessica Jones season 2, followed by Black Panther when I finally get around to watching it.

Star Trek Discovery Review

Starring Sonequa Martin-Green, Doug Jones, Jason Isaacs, Mary Wiseman, Antony Rapp and Michelle Yeoh.

Contains Minor Spoilers

It’s not been the best year for Sci-Fi on TV. Doctor Who’s run was distinctly average, Red Dwarf has only given us 1 good episode from 4 so far and then there’s Star Trek Discovery, whose opening episodes have majorly disappointed me.

I only got into Star Trek recently, thanks mainly to Netflix who put all 5 (The Original Series, Next Generation, Deep Space Nine, Voyager and Enterprise) live action Star Trek shows on its roster last year. I watched Voyager’s entire run and loved it, and I’ve delved into one or two of Next Gen’s episodes (mainly the ones with the Borg or Q) and enjoyed them. So when Netflix debuted a brand new Star Trek series with modern effects and a cast featuring a couple of famous faces, I thought I’d give it a go. I wish I hadn’t.

It does look brilliant. We’re talking cinematic level quality here. Netflix clearly spent a lot of money on this. A big space battle in episode 2 is up there with the kind of fights we’ve got from the Guardians of the Galaxy movies. The direction isn’t bad either, and the action scenes in general are high quality. But now I start running out of positives. There are several things which will annoy existing Star Trek fans, such as the utterly pointless redesign of the Klingons and how much more advanced the technology looks than the previous star trek series (which considering this is a prequel to every series but Enterprise is a bit stupid). But these are minor issues compared to the big one. The series’ tone and characters completely suck. It tries to be very dark and gritty, which is never what Star Trek has been about. The whole Klingon-Federation war which drives the shows plotline doesn’t really work because of the shows prequel status (i.e. you know the humans and their allies won’t lose, so the stakes are limited to the survival of the main cast). Sure, the TV series and movies occasionally veer into very dark territory, but normally as a exception to the more usual fun and hopeful vibe they have. Discovery is so concerned with putting flawed characters in morally compromised, depressing situations that it completely forgets to have any fun. (I.e. they went the Batman vs. Superman route when they should have been going for a Rogue One kind of tone). The characters don’t help matters either.

Sonequa Martin-Green isn’t a bad actor, but most Star Trek series hinge a lot on their lead, and Human/Vulcan hybrid Michael Burnham just isn’t interesting enough as a character to merit being a series lead. She lacks the likeability and charm of a Kirk, Picard, Sisko or Janeway, and to be honest, Vulcans are always pretty dull characters to focus on in Star Trek, so having a Vulcanized Human as the lead was probably never a good idea (Spock and Tuvok had their moments, but there’s not a lot of places you can take people who have such a limited emotional range).

The support cast aren’t much better. Jason Isaacs gets stuck in a pretty clichéd and thankless role as Captain Lorca, Doug Jones fails to give you any reason to care about Saru, and Antony Rapp’s engineer sucks the joy out of every scene he’s in. Mary Wiseman is the lone exception, as her perky, optimistic character offers much needed light relief. Unfortunately, she has no one similar to bounce off and this limits how well her character works. Michelle Yeoh is the best thing about the cast, but as a recurring guest star isn’t heavily enough involved to make much of a difference.

The Klingon sections also grow tiresome, mainly because the one Klingon with any screen presence is killed off early in the shows run, leaving a load of inadequate stand in villains to step in for the rest of the run. There’s no Worf or B’Elanna to give the Klingons a sympathetic face, and that makes the whole Federation-Klingon war a very one-sided affair.

After 4 episodes, I ran out of both enthusiasm and patience. Even though the individual episodes were relatively engaging, the overall plotline and cast weren’t. I’ve given up because I didn’t see any reason to persevere (normally I give a new show 5 episodes to prove itself, but this one showed so little potential I couldn’t be bothered). I started watching Deep Space Nine instead, and even though the first series of that show is a VERY mixed bag in terms of quality, the characters are engaging enough and the show delivered enough good episodes with the bad that I’ve stuck with it.

To sum up: if you have Netflix and want to try Star Trek, don’t bother with Discovery. Go watch Next Gen, DS9 or Voyager instead (or even the Original Series or Enterprise if your feeling brave). Discovery isn’t just bad Sci-fi, its bad Sci-Fi which barely qualifies as Star Trek. Honestly haven’t been this disappointed with Netflix before. The show may improve, but frankly, I’m not interested enough in its plot or characters to care.

Rating: 2 out of 5 (Lowest Series rating I’ve ever given).

Also: blandest Star Trek theme tune ever? Its just downright dull compared to the epic, mysterious or triumphant themes the other shows (and films) have.

 

 

 

My Top 10 TV Shows of 2016

I only did a top 5 last year but I felt I’d watched considerably more this time, so a top 10 seemed more appropriate.

Minor spoilers for all shows – no real specifics though, don’t worry.

10. Gotham (Season 2 Part 2/Season 3 Part 1) Gotham has often been considered the problem child of the DC universe – it isn’t part of the Arrowverse or the movies and thus sits awkwardly in the middle. Its tone tends to be wildly uneven – one episode gave us the hilariously OTT ending of Butch blowing up a villain with a Bazooka while another had the incredibly tense sequence where the Mad Hatter forced Jim to choose which of his two love interests was shot. However, this year has seen arguably its best run of episodes yet, with a superb Mr. Freeze origin story, a very sweet romance between the teenage Bruce and Selina, a great main villain in season 3 in the Mad Hatter and the winning combination of Penguin and Riddler, who are arguably the best villains on any superhero show right now. The show has miss-stepped a fair few times (the godawful Gordon in prison episode, two lacklustre season finales) but overall its showing great promise, and the first six episodes of season 3 were simply amazing.

9. The Grand Tour (Series 1) Clarkson, Hammond and May’s return may be a mixed bag of the hilarious and the cringe worthy, but overall its been a very welcome addition as well as the main reason to fork out for Amazon Prime. There’s been a few duff moments (particularly in the second episode ‘Operation Desert Stumble) but overall its given us all of the comedy, cars and catastrophe we wanted. It goes without saying, its completely trounced (and savagely mocked) the travesty/pile of excrement which was the Chris Evans version. Serves the BBC right.

8. IZombie (Season 2 Part 2) Anyone who’s not tried IZombie due to the stupid sounding title should really give it a second thought. The unique plotline it has (Zombies gain temporary memories/personality traits from the brains they eat, which allows main character Liv to solve the murders of people who end up in the morgue she works in) really opens up a wealth of storytelling potential, while also leading to some great comedy (the episodes where Liv eats the brain of an erotic novelist spring to mind, though there’s plenty of others with great comedy from similar ideas). The second half of season two in particular ramps up the drama element as more of the main cast find out about Liv’s true nature and the company that created the Zombie outbreak comes under the spotlight. Roll on season 3!

7. The Great British Bake Off (The final series that anyone will bother watching) Second only to the terrible Top Gear reboot in the list of BBC cock-ups this year was the loss of Bake Off to Channel 4 (seriously, who the fuck will watch it with no Mel, Sue, Mary as well as having to put up with sodding ad-breaks). I may have been a late-comer to the series, but the sheer charm of it all won me over and as it is it’s unofficial swansong, I thought i’d include it in my list. Full of the brilliant Mel/Sue interplay with the contestants, lavish desserts and culinary disasters (Andrew forgetting to put the oven on was hilarious) it also gave us a real character in Selasi (to cool to put into words) contestants who were easy to root for in Andrew and Benjamina and my personal favourite, pout-queen Candice Brown (too sweet for words – simply adored her!). This series was the perfect send off to a teatime treat of a show.

6. Legends of Tomorrow (Season 1 Part 2/Season 2 Part 1) The Arrow/Flash spinoff took a few episodes to get going in 2015, but it blew it out of the park in 2016 and surpassed both its parent shows (I sense a pattern emerging – expect Supergirl to be high on this list next year!). The first season gave us a thrilling climax as the team contended with the time masters and Vandal Savage, and the second gave us one of the best supervillain team ups in history as Malcolm Merlyn, the Reverse Flash and Damien Darhk joined forces (Legion of Doom!!!) It also has some of the most colourful characters from the Arrowverse in anti-heroes Snart and Mick (Captain Cold and Heatwave), Captain Rip played by Rory from Doctor Who!! (usually amusingly muttering ‘oh bloody hell…’ as the teams plans fall apart every week) and Sara/White Canary, who continues to be one of my favourite superhero characters (who else can seduce both the Queen of France and girls in Salem in the same episode? Her becoming temporary captain also really gave her character some great material this year. A very silly superhero show, but isn’t that just what we need after 2016?

5. Black Mirror (Series 3) The first of 3 Netflix series in my top 5, Black Mirror’s move from channel 4 to Netflix looks increasingly inspired. Not only has it got rid of ad-breaks and freed up the episodes running time, but increasing the series length to 6 episodes seems to have improved the quality rather than detracted from it. Even weaker episodes like ‘Playtest’ are still worth watching, while there’s some classically dark instalments with clever stings in the tail like ‘Shut Up and Dance’, for those who want more of what series 1 and 2 gave us, as well as new concepts and episode formats. The highlight for me, has to be ‘San Junipero’, sad and heartwarming in equal measure and a very neat sci-fi idea. Overall though, its a sublime run of episodes and well worth your time.

4. Game of Thrones (Season 6) Thrones might not have had a particularly consistent run of episodes (a real slow-burner mid-season with a bit too much padding, particularly in the Arya and King’s Landing storylines) but who cares when it still gave us exactly what we wanted in a kick-ass and explosive finale, a scintillating clash between Jon Snow and Ramsay, Daenerys being awesome for the first time in a while and the sheer horror of the white walkers attack leading to the tearjerking ‘Hold the Door’ moment. If season 7 can keep up the work of episodes like ‘Home’, ‘Battle of the Bastards’ or ‘The Winds of Winter’, then we’re sitting pretty for a thrilling penultimate series.

3. Orange is the New Black (Season 4) Orange is the New Black has got stronger every season and the fourth series doesn’t buck the trend. Despite being arguably one of the darkest series we’ve had from the scriptwriters, it balanced comedy and tragedy as effectively as ever. Any series that combines tear-jerking mental health plotlines and that horrifying twist at the end of episode 12 with laugh out loud moments such as the unlikeliest threesome probably ever seen on TV (I won’t spoil it, its so much better if you aren’t expecting it) is clearly onto a winner. Well done OITNB, yet again you’ve been one of the Netflix highlights this year. Just not as good as…

2. House of Cards (Season 4) After a mixed third season, House of Cards turned things around and delivered what may be its best season so far. Kevin Spacey and Robin Wright’s acting was first class as always, but this time the writing was on par with their performances as the shows version of the US presidential election provided great drama and plenty of shock narrative twists. The way they utilised characters from previous seasons like ex-president Walker, Lucas Goodwin and Raymond Tusk was both expertly done and a real treat for long-term fans. I’ll credit them for not simply caricaturing Trump and Clinton either, instead giving us Joel Kinnaman’s Republican candidate Will Conway who seems like the ideal potential president, but has weaknesses/flaws that become apparent over the season, and was a far more engaging type of figure for Francis to face off with as he was continually at a PR disadvantage. Bring on season 5!

1.The Americans (Season 4) The most consistent series on television was a stand-out this year as the Russian spy pair/American married couple dealt with more problems than ever before as their lives increasingly teetered on the edge of unravelling. Dylan Baker was the stand-out guest star as a Soviet sympathiser working in an American viral lab, while the main cast was as great as ever, particularly Matthew Rhys, Keri Russell, Frank Langella and Alison Wright. The Jennings had to deal with their daughter’s struggle to accept their true identity, the loss of one of their closest informants and missions they worth becoming increasingly uncomfortable with. A slightly lacklustre season finale aside, it was a flawless run with several shock character exits and plot twists, can’t wait for the final two seasons of this thrilling if slow-burning drama.

Missing out on the list was Arrow (still rebuilding after a so-so year), Flash (ditto, Zoom was the most disappointing villain I’ve seen from DC’s TV universe), Red Dwarf (promising but not back to its best yet) and Jessica Jones (too much padding). There are some shows I haven’t got round to watching yet (Supergirl and Westworld for example) and some I just don’t watch (like Walking Dead).

As for the disappointments of the year, my worst offenders have to be the Chris Evans Top Gear (for obvious reasons – what a TWAT!), Doctor Who spin-off Class (very pointless – even Torchwood Series 1 was less awkward) and Luke Cage, which completely wasted its potential and contrived to make sure whichever style of show you like, you would hate half the season. (Congrats Marvel, you have made something worse than Agents of Shield… can’t you just give us Jessica Jones season 2 already?!)

My TV Awards 2016

Best Actor: Matthew Rhys (The Americans)
Best Actress: Krysten Ritter (Jessica Jones)/Robin Wright (House of Cards)
Best Supporting Actor: David Tennant (Jessica Jones)
Best Supporting Actress: Lori Petty (Orange is the New Black)
Best Episode: The Winds of Winter (Game of Thrones)
Best Hero: Sara Lance (Legends of Tomorrow)
Best Villain: Ramsay Snow (Game of Thrones)
Best Scripting: The Americans
Best Direction: Black Mirror
Best Soundtrack: Game of Thrones

If you’ve got your own list or disagree with mine, feel free to comment below. Happy New Year!

Review: Orange is the New Black, Season 3

Orange is the New Black, starring Taylor Schilling, Laura Prepon and Kate Mulgrew

Warning: Spoilers for seasons 1-3

One of the three major shows on Netflix (along with House of Cards and Breaking Bad), Orange is the New Black is notable as being one of the few shows on TV with an almost entirely female led cast – apart from a few of the guards and the odd husband/boyfriend, men don’t have much prominence save in a few flashbacks. But this isn’t a bad thing, and the show has arguably one of the best casts on TV, with seldom a weak performance. And, no, this isn’t just a show for women, I’d recommend guys watch it as well.

Is it a comedy or a drama (or a softcore lesbian film)? To be honest, it can be all three of these, and the fact the show is hard to define isn’t a bad thing. Season 3 has the most split focus of the 3 seasons so far, with multiple subplots rather than one overriding plotline – but I thought this was a big improvement (unlike those reviewers over at Den of Geek – who pissed me off criticising this season to the extent I’m now reviewing it just to voice my disagreement). Season 1 was mainly based on how the privileged Piper Chapman (Schilling) adjusted to living in prison for the first time, and her relationship with Alex (Prepon) a lesbian ex-lover who grassed up Chapman to the police for her involvement in a drug ring Alex ran. Season 2 expanded things a bit, with new prison inmate Vee being the focus as the most despicable villain this show has delivered so far, while Chapman dealt with the breakdown of her relationship with her fiancée Larry on the outside, as well as loneliness after Alex got released.

Season 3 is a different beast – with the three main villains of season 1 and 2 (the perverted prison guard Mendez, the inmate Vee and corrupt prison boss Natalie) gone or limited to cameos, the show spends more time on its supporting cast – even the minor characters like Chang and Norma, who had little to do in seasons 1 and 2, get flashbacks in 3 which enrich their characters.

The major subplots? There’s a religious cult that develops around Norma, one of the inmates who despite being mute has a natural ability to connect with and sooth other inmates, which provides its share of both drama and ludricous comedy, but manages to avoid repeating season 1’s fanatical christian plotline. Joe Caputo, the prison manager, becomes a key player this season as he struggles to keep the prison open, appease his staff and the new management and remain ‘the good guy’ he has been striving to be all his life – probably the most cohesive plot arc of the season. The funniest plot without doubt had to be ‘Crazy Eyes’ Warren writing overtly sexual sci-fi fiction which becomes a hit among both the prisoners and a few of the guards, and redeemed crazy eyes in my opinion after I grew to hate her due to her association with Vee in season 2. The fake conversion of the black prisoners to Judaism in order to get the superior Kosher meals also provides plenty of laughs, while their adoption of prisoner outcast Soso in the final episode was heartwarming (and will hopefully make Soso a less annoying character in season 4). Pennsatucky and Big Boo are also a surprisingly affecting odd-couple friendship, and Pennsatucky herself has gone from one of the main antagonists in season 1 to one of the most likeable characters in season 3 – it’s amazing what the right pairing and a few flashbacks can do.

As for Piper, after ensuring Alex got re-arrested at the end of season 2, here they resume their twisted yet loveable relationship (now even, having both screwed each other over – both literally and figuratively) but there’s a few new elements in the mix: Alex’s new paranoia that her former drug boss is out to murder her for betraying him, Piper’s new enterprise which involves selling prisoners’ used panties to online perverts for profit (surely both the weirdest and the funniest idea OITNB has ever come up with!) and Stella (Ruby Rose) a new inmate who catches Piper’s eye (and that of most of the viewers judging by the comments i’ve seen!). This new love triangle isn’t as wearisome as the Larry-Piper-Alex one in season 1, and Piper is far less annoying than in previous seasons as her character becomes both colder and more ruthless – a welcome change from the insecure mess she occasionally became in earlier episodes.

Overall, season 3 is definitely my favourite of the 3 so far, the comedy is at its apex and the drama took a step back after getting slightly too dark last season, and Piper and various other characters have become much more likeable.

Season Rating: 4.5 out of 5.