Tag Archives: Lemony Snicket

A Series of Unfortunate Events, Season 3 Review

Starring: Neil Patrick Harris, Patrick Warburton, Malina Weissman, Louis Hynes, Presley Smith and Lucy Punch

Warning: Minor Spoilers Follow

I wasn’t all that impressed with the first season of Netflix’s adaptation. Sure, it was entertaining in its way and better than the film, but let’s be honest, that isn’t hard. The second season picked up a bit, but mainly because it was based on some of the better books in the series (and even then, it’s Vile Village adaptation was dire). Fortunately, it’s a case of third time lucky for Netflix. I don’t know whether or not its that the scriptwriters just kicked things up a gear or the fact that these episodes are based off the best books in the series or that because the final season its more focused on wrapping things up in a satisfying way, but this one WORKED!

Neil Patrick Harris, now freed from the need to play a different version of a disguised Olaf every week, is at his best here. Olaf is menacing, OTT, world-weary and maniacal, sometimes all in the same scene, and he generally carries it off with aplomb. Malina and Louis are as perfect as ever as Klaus and Violet, and Patrick Warburton finally feels like a worthwhile addition to the series. The direction and look of the thing is as great as ever, but crucially, the scripting feels a bit tighter, and boy does that make a difference. Notably, the episodes are a bit shorter than previous seasons, which seems to have been a smart decision. There’s noticeably less padding and everything just flows better.

There’s still the odd change from the books which doesn’t really strike you as necessary, but by and large, its a pretty faithful adaptation of events. But there’s one bonus here book readers will love – you finally get answers that the books, crucially, did not give you. Flashbacks in the Penultimate Peril two-parter really help to flesh out the schism, the sugar bowl, Olaf’s turn from Volunteer to Villain and Lemony and Kit Snicket’s characters. Kit Snicket is perfectly cast as well, which is crucial seeing as she’s so important to the last few books. The other bonus is the welcome return of Carmelita Spats, who is perfectly done and is endlessly entertaining when onscreen. Lucy Punch isn’t quite as memorable as Esme as she was last season, but she still gets the odd moment.

It’s not perfect by any means – Phil still seems miscast, the Violet and Quigley subplot seems rushed and the decision to spare the bald man and the henchperson of indeterminate gender last season doesn’t really serve any purpose, but for the most part, this is a big improvement over the last two seasons. But for everything that doesn’t work, there’s plenty that does. Usman Ally nearly steals the show as the hook-handed man, while the Klaus and Fiona subplot works very believably.  The Man with Beard but no hair (played by Richard E. Grant) and the Woman with Hair but no Beard make a great set of villains to throw both Olaf and the Orphans off balance in this series as well.

Overall, Netflix finally manages to strike the right tone and conclude the series in an engaging, satisfying way. The cast give their all and the writing’s stepped up a gear from last season. The flashbacks alone give book readers a reason to check this out – it really answers any questions the books ever left you wondering…

Rating: 4 out of 5

The theme tune really is catchy isn’t it?

Advertisements

A Series of Unfortunate Events, Series 2 Review

Starring Neil Patrick Harris, Patrick Warburton, Malina Weissman and Louis Hynes

Spoiler Free

I loved the Series of Unfortunate Events books as a kid. Like many, I was slightly disappointed by the film adaptation starring Jim Carrey as Count Olaf, which lacked the soul of the original. While Series 1 of the more successful Netflix adaptation was undoubtedly a step up, it still wasn’t quite on par with the standard of the books. However, as books 1-4 weren’t exactly the best in the series, I was curious to see if the TV show would improve when adapting better material frim books 5-9. Has it? Sort of.

As with series 1, my main praise would have to go to the show’s cast and production. It looks amazing and you can’t really pick out a weak link in the cast. Neil Patrick Harris excels with most of his various guises (only Detective Dupin from a Vile Village is disappointing, and I’d blame that firmly on how poorly he’s written rather than Harris) and the Baudelaire’s actors keep the children easy to root for. The new additions to the supporting cast are generally great. Lucy Punch in some ways overshadows Harris as Esme Squalor, while Carmelita Spats is done absolutely perfectly in Austere Academy. Fellow newcomer Nathan Fillion also makes Jacques Snicket one of the best things in the first half of the season.

Unfortunately the writing isn’t always as spot on as the casting. While the series gets a strong start with Austere Academy and Ersatz Elevator, the Vile Village adaptation is resolutely dull. Hostile Hospital is watchable despite being based on one of the weakest books, while Carnivorous Carnival is a game of two halves (the first episode is great, the second not so much). I feel like one problem the series has is that the two episode per book structure is hamstringing some of the more slow-paced books, like Vile Village, as the increased focus on the Volunteers and the Villains forces the show to condense a lot of what the children got up to in the books. Books fans might also be perplexed by one or two changes from the novels (for example, two of Olaf’s henchmen who died in books 8 and 9 are inexplicably still alive at the end of series 2, for no apparent reason).

While there’s a lot of fun to be had from the performances, I still feel like this show doesn’t know exactly what it wants to be. It isn’t funny enough for a dark-humoured comedy and its tone isn’t dark enough (despite the subject matter) for it to be a great drama. Sure, it’s entertaining, but Olaf is still nowhere near as menacing as in the books, and you don’t feel tension anywhere near as often as the show seems to want you to.

In short, this is slightly better that series one, but only because it’s based off some of the better books, not because they’ve drastically improved things. So if you liked the first series, the second will happily give you more of the same. If the first series left you sceptical, the second won’t change your mind. Hopefully Series 3 can end this adaptation on a high, but I’ll be watching it for completionists’ sake, not because I consider it essential viewing.

Rating: 3.5 out of 5

Next up, I finally get around to reviewing Black Panther…