Category Archives: Top Tens

My Top Video Games of 2018

As usual, this list is compromised of favourite video games that I’ve played in 2018. I should say this doesn’t mean only video games that were released in 2018. I normally also throw in a couple from the last few years that I’ve just got around to. It doesn’t include every game that’s been a hit in 2018 either (I haven’t really played enough of Spider-Man to have an opinion of it yet, nor have I got Red Dead Redemption 2). Equally there are plenty of games which I’m just not interested in (Black Ops, Fortnite, FIFA etc.) so don’t expect to see them here.

7. Assassin’s Creed Odyssey: Odyssey is easily the best Assassin’s Creed game in a long time. The combat finally feels fluid, the game looks amazing and Ancient Greece is a really interesting setting. You can finally choose the lead (either Kassandra or Alexios. But I’ll save you time – choose Kassandra) and the game is now pretty much a full on RPG with a revised skill tree, better weapon/crafting systems and the ability to not only choose dialogue but even romance/flirt with NPC’s. Naval combat is back too, with a fully-upgradeable ship again. Unfortunately, the game’s still not perfect. The approach to in-game quests is unfortunately one of quantity over quality – there’s actually too much to do in a single playthrough, but the problem is that the quests tend to be quite repetitive – go to this location and wipe out this bandit camp, fetch this item from this location etc. while the setting and characters make a fair few of the quests memorable, I doubt you’ll remember even half of them by the end of the game. Ultimately, it’s a beautiful game world and the gameplay is a definite improvement on Origins, but I must say, Origins handled side quests better and had a more involving main questline. On the plus side, Kassandra is possibly the best lead we’ve had in the series – yes, including Ezio.

Rating: 4 out of 5

6. Onrush: Onrush isn’t so much a racing game as a full vehicular combat sim. For example, it has four different event types, none of which have a finish line you need to cross first. The game is far more unique than that. Instead, you gain points for boosting, rushing, jumping, performing tricks and wrecking opponents. If you fall behind the pack, the game simply respawns you back into the action, so there’s never a need to restart a match. It has four event types: Overdrive (two teams compete to earn a higher score), Countdown (teams race through gates, each of which adds time to their clock until one team runs out of time), Switch (each player starts with three lives, first team to run out of lives loses – but everyone you lose a life you switch to a tougher vehicle, and once you’ve lost all three you switch to the mega-tough trucks and must hunt down the enemy team) and Lockdown, where teams must compete to capture moving zones. They’re all great fun, and fans of Motorstorm games in particular will love it. Best of all – if you have PS Plus, you can get it for free right now as its one of the monthly giveaway games!

Rating: 4 out of 5

5. Titanfall 2: The only entry from 2017 on this list, I picked up Titanfall 2 for £4!!! Best buy I’ve made all year. Sure its campaign may be relatively short, but this is a far better shooter than COD or Battlefield games have ever been, and it has a good story to boot! Set in the future, there’s a mix of high-tech weapons for you to play around with, but the main draw for this game is the ability to control a titan – a hulking robotic weapons frame that seriously gives you an edge in combat, which can be upgraded with a wide variety of weapons. Before you buy tat like Black Ops IV or overpriced releases like Battlefield V, give this a shout. You won’t regret it.

Rating: 4 out of 5

4. Hitman 2 (2018) I’ve really got into Hitman games this year. First off I completed Hitman Absolution on PS3 (which I’ve been meaning to get round to for years) and enjoyed it quite a lot, so I thought I’d give the 2016 sandbox a look. I loved it over the summer, and happily picked up this year’s sequel once it was on sale. Not only does Hitman 2 give you 6 new areas to play around in and plan/improvise your assassinations (the most memorable of which include a slum in Mumbai, an expo park + racetrack in Miami and a medieval castle on a French island) but it also throws in legacy additions of Hitman 2016’s levels for anyone who already owns that game. Given that Hitman 2 has really improved the graphics and the shooting mechanics, this is extremely welcome. The game gives you a ridiculous amount of freedom in how to assassinate your various targets (please take note Assassin’s Creed) and whether your weapon of choice is a sniper rifle, explosives, poison, silenced pistols or 47’s signature garrotte, you’ll still stumble across some incredibly inventive ways to complete your mission (the standouts so far have been throwing a drug dealer down a mineshaft, locking a ruthless businesswoman in a medieval spiked effigy and subtly manoeuvring your targets out in the open to help a rival assassin execute them with a sniper rifle). You’ll need patience, and often things will go dramatically wrong and you’ll have to improvise, but perfectly your strategies if half the fun here. Best Hitman game ever, if not one that is particularly revolutionary.

Rating: 4.5 out of 5

3. F1 2018: F1’s simulation games have got stronger year on year since 2016, and this year was no exception. The addition of ERS management added another degree of difficulty to racing, while the rain and car damage effects feel more realistic than ever before. The R&D mechanics have been streamlined and it now feels legitimately possible to turn a middle-field car into a frontrunner over a few seasons. There’s still the odd niggle (driver AI could be slightly better when there’s several cars following close behind each other) and the interviews are overused, but to be honest, given how much freedom you have to scale back or disable parts of the sim you aren’t interested in, any problems are mildly inconvenient rather than consistently irritating. As a bonus, the number of classic cars you can drive in the championships mode and time trials has gone up too. Its a refinement of F1 2017 rather than a huge leap forward, but ultimately, its the best F1 game on the market, and is well worth the upgrade.

Rating: 4.5 out of 5

2. Detroit: Become Human: Made by the creators of Heavy Rain and Beyond: Two Souls, Detroit: Become Human is set in 2038, where androids have become an integral part of human society, but, predictably, are starting to rebel against their servile situation and become ‘deviants’ outside human control. The game follows three very different strands which cross over with each other at various points. First off, there’s Kara, an android housekeeper charged with protecting a young girl called Alice, who becomes a deviant to defy her owner: Alice’s abusive father, Todd. The two then must go on the run together. The second story follows Markus, a prototype android who initially has a pleasant existence tending to his pleasant human owner, Carl, but then sees the callous disregard other humans have for androids and begins encouraging them to rise up against their creators.  Finally, there’s investigative android Connor, who’s paired with a human detective called Hank and assigned to investigate the cause of android deviancy. The amount of choice the game gives you is staggering – as is the number of places you can screw up, especially on harder difficulty. All three of the lead characters can be killed if you make the wrong choices, and the way the game ends can vary markedly depending on your choices. Markus can either lead a peaceful protest against humanity or a violent revolt, while Connor can either obey his programming and hunt Markus down or become a deviant himself. Kara and Alice may escape together or one or both of them may die depending on the choices you make. As is usual for story-driven games, the gameplay is mainly focused on quick-time events, but its the story where this really shines – there’s tons of replay value here and trust me, even though the ideas here are very common sci-fi tropes, they’re done so well you will get sucked into the setting.

Rating: 4.5 out of 5

1. God of War (2018): Kratos is back, only this time he had Norse Gods and monsters to contend with rather than Greek. Moving from a bloody hack-and-slash to a violent RPG was a bold move for the series, but boy did it pay off. The gameplay is wonderful, with players either utilizing Kratos’ Leviathan Axe (which works a lot like Thor’s Hammer) or his more traditional Blades of Chaos to dispatch enemies. The game world is absolutely beautiful and epic in scope – not only can you explore a sizeable area, but you get chances to explore several of the ‘nine realms’ of Norse mythology including Muspelheim (Realm of Fire) and Helheim (Realm of the Dead). Combat is challenging on normal but not inaccessible to either newcomers or existing fans of the series. There’s a vast range of enemies, ranging from undead to giants to the awesomely powerful (and crucially, optional bosses) Valkyries. You’ll need to switch up your strategy for a lot of enemies, with good tactics and timing more important than button mashing. But its the story where this really shines, as Kratos struggles to deal with his wife’s death while trying to be a good father to his son, Atreus and fending off attacks from various Norse monsters and Gods, including two very irritating sons of Thor. It’s been a good year for gaming (especially on PS4) but nothing could outdo this. A stone cold classic.

Rating: 5 out of 5

My Game Awards:

Best Looking Game: Titanfall 2

Best Level Design: Hitman 2

Best Story: God of War

Best Combat: God of War

Best Hero: Markus (Detroit: Become Human)

Best Villain: Baldur (God of War)

Best Soundtrack: Detroit: Become Human

Best Character (Female): Kassandra (Assassin’s Creed Odyssey)

Best Character (Male): Connor (Detroit: Become Human)

I won’t do any ‘Worst’ awards because I haven’t played any particularly bad games this year. Just assume they’d all go to Fallout 76 and Bethesda. Congrats guys. You managed to temporarily replace EA as gaming’s signature villain. Good job. You’re second only to Doctor Who’s Chris Chibnall in not listening to what the fanbase wants.

Overall though, it has been a fantastic year for gaming, with numerous classics and good instalments from long-running franchises. If your still messing around with COD and Fifa… wake up people. There’s far, FAR better things to spend your money on. Finally, if you’re a Xbox gamer… you have my sympathy – because the amount you’ve missed out on the past few years isn’t even funny anymore (God of War, Spiderman, Detroit: Become Human, Uncharted 4, Ratchet and Clank, Horizon Zero Dawn, The Last of Us…) no amount of console loyalty is worth that. Microsoft better buck up their ideas – because Sony is killing it right now!

Anyway, that’s it, my last blog post of 2018. Thank you all for reading and subscribing in what’s (just about) been a record breaking year for this blog.

Have a happy new year everyone. I’ll be back in 2019!

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The Best and Worst TV of 2018

So, after films, we’re onto TV. I’m not going to run through all the stuff I’ve seen for this one, mainly because I’ve not caught up with a lot of US TV shows like Arrow and Legends of Tomorrow, so I can only review half the episodes from this year. Bear in mind I’ve not seen some of the best received stuff this year (The Bodyguard, A Very English Scandal etc.) so this is basely solely off what I’ve seen and is my opinion, not a definitive list! Feel free to comment your own best/worst shows below.

I’ll try to keep this as spoiler free as possible.

Top Five:

1. The Americans (Season 6) – The best way to some up the quality of this sublime spy drama set in the cold war is as follows: even if Game of Thrones absolutely nails Season 8 next year with battle scenes above Lord of the Rings intensity and standard, I’ll probably still name The Americans as the TV show of the Decade. It’s been that good. It’s had 5 great seasons and 1 that was merely good, but that’s still a better hit rate than any other six season show I can think of. I’ve given perhaps one episode in its entire run 3.5/5. Everything else has been 4/5 or (usually) even higher. The final season somehow managed to ramp things up a gear while still remaining the slow burning tense classic its always been. Not only did it use the masterstroke of having lead KGB spies Philip and Elizabeth on opposite sides for most of the season, but we finally saw FBI agent Stan Beeman close in on them, leading to an electrifyingly tense and devastating finale, as the Jennings finally had to face the consequences of their actions. It didn’t tie up all lose ends, but this show has always been too clever for that. After all, how many spy operations do you think have a definite, clean ending? Either way, it was utterly unmissable television, and while its one for the connoisseur rather than the mainstream, it still seems a shame that most people still haven’t had a chance to see it.

2. I’m a Celebrity (UK Series 18) – I’m not normally one for reality TV, but this had such a good line-up that I just had to give it a go. I do like I’m a celeb, but usually they have truly detestable celebs on there, like Katie Price or Gemma Collins, so I’ve avoided it for the past few years. This year though, has to be the best run the shows ever had in the UK. Not only did we have Harry Redknapp turning himself into a true national treasure with his stories, but we had Anne Hegerty battling against the odds to overcome some deep personal challenges. The show was largely heart-warming because everyone there was genuinely pleasant for the most part. Even Noel Edmonds, who you could tell was only brought in to stir things up, proved to be a pretty nice guy for most of the run. Even more surprisingly, the celebs were all very good at the trials – I don’t think I’ve ever seen this many full houses of stars! Though admittedly, they were amusingly awful at the dingo dollar challenges. The best thing of all though, had to be the cute friendship between John Barrowman (who had a song for every occasion) and Emily Atack (who was adorably cute and mischievous). If 2018 needed something, it was definitely this series, which for a few blissful weeks almost made you forget about Trump and the mess being made of Brexit.

3. Orange is the New Black (Season 6) It may not have been OITNB’s best season, but it was still Netflix’s top effort this year. Throwing all the inmates into maximum security really allowed the show to mix this up with a tenser atmosphere and some new inmates and guards. With the usual mix of comedy, dark storylines and romance (including some very surprising pairings – who’d have thought 5 years ago that Caputo and Fig would be the easiest couple on the show to root for?). ‘Badison’ made one of the show’s most detestable villains in years (probably the nastiest one since Vee in season 2) and the shows closer focus on some of the characters really allowed them to shine more than normal (Daya, Freida and Nicky in particular). Ultimately, it could have had a better overall plotline, but its set the stage for the final season well enough to scrape into my top 3.

4. Big Mouth (Season 2) Easily the funniest show on Netflix at the moment, Big Mouth is a hilarious send up of puberty that only an animated show could get away with (for obvious reasons). It has its share of family guy-esque gross out comedy and your typical teenage awkward humour, but what makes this unique is the fact it takes time to focus on both genders difficulties (usually these kind of comedies only go with one or the other) and actively personifies those awkward, stupid teenage impulses in the form of ‘hormone monsters’ who actively encourage the characters to ask each other out or to do any number of stupid things, usually with hilariously destructive or embarrassing results. It may sound ridiculous, but its worth a shot and will probably have you poking fun at your own awkward teenage experiences subconsciously – while answering all the questions you’d wished you’d had answers to ten years ago. 

5. Jessica Jones (Season 2) Despite the lack of a signature villain to rival David Tennant’s Kilgrave, Jessica Jones managed to be the most compelling superhero show this year (bearing in mind that I don’t watch Daredevil). Krysten Ritter remains one of the best actresses in Netflix’s employ, and Jessica’s self-destructive tendencies remained firmly in sight this year, particularly with Trish, Malcolm and Hogarth all having various crises of their own around her. Trish really became one of the most hateable characters on TV this series, and whether season 3 pulls off one hell of a redemption story or has her go full villain it’ll be interesting to see. The icing on the cake though, had to be Jessica’s Kilgrave hallucinations in episode 11. It was great to have David Tennant back even for just one episode, and having him play the devil on Jessica’s shoulder was a stroke of genius! Sure the first episode wasn’t great and it was still 2 or so episodes too long, but overall the series was less padded than arrow verse shows, more interesting than Luke Cage and less ridiculous than Gotham or Black Lightning.

Bottom Three:

3. Lost in Space (Netflix) – Netflix’s Lost in Space remake looked amazing, but felt hollow. It was billed as old-fashioned sci-fi, and to be honest that’s what it felt like. It was an adventure with plenty of threat and peril, but little substance or innovation. The cast worked well for the most part, even if Parker Posey’s Dr. Smith was an underwhelming villain. It was well directed and had good special effects, but ultimately, it was a very forgettable ride. Netflix can do a lot better.

2. Doctor Who Series 11 (BBC One) – Oh god, where to start with this one. How to ruin a 50+ year old show in one series? The most miscast actress possible in the title role? How to lose all the shows’ hardcore fans in a single series and achieve an audience score of 28% (and FALLING!) on Rotten Tomatoes? This isn’t Doctor Who. Its a Politically Correct Nightmare of ham-fisted dialogue, woeful villains, weak companions and patronising themes. Chris Chibnall shows his mishandling of Torchwood Series 1 and 2 was no accident – he’s even worse here. Bradley Walsh is the sole redeeming factor, but he can’t save this mess by himself. If you get past episode 5 without giving up, you’re probably a masochist or someone who’s never seen the show before. Utterly dire.

1. Britannia (Sky) – This is one mindf*ck of a show. Set during the Roman Invasion of Britain, it features a heavy emphasis on the Celts’ reaction to the Roman threat and the druids’ influence over the Britons. It has an all star cast, including Zoe Wanamaker, David Morrissey and Ian MacDiarmid, but its just so weird. The plot makes no sense, the supernatural elements feel decidedly out of place, the theme music is dire and some episodes are a real slog to get through. You might be intrigued by it initially, but honestly don’t bother. Its a total waste of your time.

Best Actor: Matthew Rhys (The Americans)

Best Actress: Krysten Ritter (Jessica Jones)/Keri Russell (The Americans)

Best Supporting Actor: Mustafa Shakir (Luke Cage)

Best Supporting Actress: Selenis Leyva (Orange is the New Black)

Best Special Effects: Lost in Space

Best Animated Show: Big Mouth

Best TV Show: The Americans

Best Episode: The Americans – Dead Hand

Best Writing: The Americans

Best Soundtrack: The Americans

Best Theme Tune: Big Mouth

Best Direction: The Americans

Best on-screen pair: Emily Atack and John Barrowman (I’m a celebrity)

Best Hero – Jessica Jones

Best Villain – Bushmaster (Luke Cage)

Worst Hero: The 13th Doctor (Doctor Who)

Worst Villain Tzim-Shaue/Tim Shaw (Doctor Who)

Worst Actor: Nikolaj Lee Kaas (Britannia)

Worst Actress: Jodie Whittaker (Doctor Who)

Worst Supporting Actor: Tosin Cole (Doctor Who)

Worst Supporting Actress: Parker Posey (Lost in Space)

Worst Writing: Chris Chibnall (Doctor Who)

Worst Episode: Britannia – Episode 7

Worst Soundtrack: Britannia

Worst TV Show: Britannia

 

Best and Worst Films of 2018

This is a run-through of all the films I have watched that were released this year – and a quick comment about each one, plus the rating I would give it. Films are ordered from worst to best. Needless to say, this isn’t a definitive list – there’s various films I haven’t seen this year (Aquaman, Venom, Into the Spider-verse etc.) but it includes all the ones I have managed to catch – either in cinemas or on Amazon/Netflix.

The Death of Stalin: I expected better from Armando Iannucci. I really can’t work out this film’s intended audience or why critics loved it so much. Its not funny enough to be a comedy, not cutting enough to be a satire and not believable enough to be historically accurate. The thing is wonderfully shot and well-directed, but ultimately that isn’t a big comfort. The cast by and large try their best, but Jeffrey Tambor is a total waste of space and the whole thing is just dull and uncomfortable.

Rating: 2 out of 5

Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom: You know, after watching this, I’m glad Star Wars fired Colin Trevorrow. The film is pretty much your standard B-Movie: entertaining, but utterly ridiculous and so, SO STUPID in places. Still not the worst Jurassic Park Sequel (III will always be the series nadir – at least you’d hope so) but it came close. Its cast keep things watchable and the special effects are good, but the villains are way too cartoonish, the script laughable and the direction flat. Talk about a fall from grace.

Rating: 3 out of 5

Deadpool 2: Oh dear. I really wanted to like this one. In places, it’s up their with the first movie. Josh Brolin is great as cable and Zazie Beetz perfect if underused as Domino. But the rest of the cast are not on form – Firefist is a very forgettable villain, Morena Baccarin is wasted in a thankless and predictable role and TJ Miller is still the biggest waste of space in acting. It makes an effort to have a less predictable (if still cliched) plot than the first movie, but isn’t anywhere near as funny. The action sequences are better, but honestly, I’m not sure I’ll bother with the inevitable third film.

Rating: 3 out of 5

Slaughterhouse Rulez: The latest Pegg/Frost film gives the duo less screen time than normal, but the young cast by and large make up for it, particularly the wonderful Asa Butterfield. The script isn’t their best, but its still involving and funnier than some of their previous efforts (looking at you World’s End) if nowhere near their best work (Paul and Hot Fuzz).

Rating: 3 out of 5

Solo: A Star Wars Story: Once it stops pandering to its intended audience with on-the-nose fan service, this actually becomes quite an involving heist/action film. The cast are good value and the direction and soundtrack work well, but ultimately, it’s all a bit too predictable and lightweight. Alden does the impossible in actually playing Han Solo in a way that feels plausible but not a parody of Harrison Ford. Donald Glover nails Lando (who really should have been the main star in a spin-off) and Phoebe Waller-Bridge has a nice role as a comedic, rebellious droid companion of Lando’s.

Rating: 3.5 out of 5

Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of Grindelwald: An entertaining if convoluted film. The cast all perform well, but the variable direction and an overpacked script let things down a bit. Depp and Jude Law are the standouts as Grindelwald and Dumbledore, and the final act is worth waiting for. Not bad by any means, but not one of JK’s best either.

Rating: 3.5 out of 5

Black Panther: A milestone for cinema, but a very overrated one. While the script was quite good, its execution could have been a lot better. With a forgettable soundtrack, predictable plotline and some of the worst CGI we’ve ever seen in a Marvel film, Black Panther was entertaining and thought-provoking, but nowhere near the classic some reviewers seem to have tried to frame it as.

Rating: 3.5 out of 5

Tomb Raider: While this didn’t prove video game films are good, it did prove they aren’t universally terrible. Alicia Vikander is perfect in the role of Lara Croft, and the film is well-structed and shot beautifully. That said, the script isn’t the most original, and the dialogue could definitely be better in places. Still a pleasant surprise though.

Rating: 3.5 out of 5

Avengers: Infinity War: Probably the most ambitious superhero film ever made, Infinity War is a bombastic crowd pleaser that mixes Marvel’s first truly great villain Thanos with tons of fan-service and excellent action sequences. Its still a Marvel film though, and pulls its punches too much and is hampered by very much being ‘part 1’ of 2, whatever the film’s title says.

Rating: 4 out of 5

Incredibles 2: It doesn’t match the original, but boy, they gave it a good go. Incredibles 2 features some of the best animation I’ve seen in a long time, and is a very engaging, slick ride. Its humour is on-point throughout, and while the villain doesn’t match Syndrome, the films plot and script have few flaws. Very entertaining stuff.

Rating: 4 out of 5

Ant-Man and the Wasp: Top of the pile again? Ant-man remains the best and most undervalued of Marvel’s franchises, with this funny, heartfelt sequel. Like the original, it takes 45 minutes to really get going, but once it gets there, its utterly brilliant. Paul Rudd remains an extremely likeable lead, and Evangeline Lilly is ever bit his equal. The villains aren’t that memorable, but for once, I didn’t really care.

Rating: 4.5 out of 5

Overall, I think its fair to say this hasn’t been a classic year for cinema. Most films I’ve seen have been underwhelming or distinctly average. The rule of increasingly inferior sequels has definitely reared its head again (aside from the odd exception like Avengers and Ant-Man). Here’s hoping for better in 2019. To finish off, here’s my awards for the standout actors, actresses, soundtracks and direction from films this year.

My Film Awards 2018:

Best Actor: Josh Brolin (Thanos/Cable)

Best Actress: Alicia Vikander (Tomb Raider)

Best Supporting Actor: Asa Butterfield (Slaughterhouse Rulez)

Best Supporting Actress: Letitia Wright (Black Panther)

Best Animated Film: Incredibles 2

Best Film: Ant-Man and the Wasp

Best Script: Black Panther

Best Director: Ron Howard (Solo: A Star Wars Story)

Best Special Effects: Infinity War

Best Soundtrack: James Newton Howard (Fantastic Beasts: The Crimes of Grindelwald)

Best Hero: Iron Man

Best Villain: Thanos

Worst Actor: Rafe Spall (Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom)

Worst Actress: Amber Heard (Aquaman) – I haven’t seen this yet, but given her performance in the trailer, it seems like a sure fire bet. Also – I couldn’t think of anyone in the films I have seen who deserves it.

Worst Supporting Actor: TJ Miller (Deadpool 2)

Worst Supporting Actress: Brianna Hildebrand (Deadpool 2)

Worst Film: The Death of Stalin

Worst Script: Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom

Worst Director: David Leitch (Deadpool 2)

Worst Special Effects: Black Panther

Worst Soundtrack: Avengers: Infinity War (Alan Silvestri)

Coming up next, my look at 2018’s TV highs and lows before I sign off the year with my take on the hit Video Games of 2018.

 

 

 

The Greatest Doctor Who Moments from Series 1 to 10.

As Doctor Who returns tonight, it marks the start of a new era. The last time we had a transition like this was 2010, when Smith and Moffat took over from Tennant and Davies. But even that had some continuity, with numerous returning writers, the same composer, a few of the same directors etc. Not so this time. Aside from Chibnall himself, pretty much everyone on the senior part of the production team is new to Who. So I thought I’d kick off the new era by celebrating the last one. So without further ado, here’s my take on the highs the show has reached since 2005. They’re in chronological order, as sorting them in a top 25 would take forever and be a bit arbitrary.

Obviously, this includes spoilers for Series 1 – 10.

  1. “You Would Make a Good Dalek” (Dalek, Series 1) Eccleston was always at his best when facing off with the Daleks, and his initial encounter with a lone Dalek in a bunker in Utah is an absolute classic. The Dalek is almost a character in its own right, and after slaughtering Van Statten’s guards with ease, the Dalek hits the Doctor with this zinger, visibly shaking him.
  2. “Just This Once, Everybody Lives!” (The Doctor Dances, Series 1) The gas mask zombies two-parter is a masterpiece from start to finish, but its this feel-good scene at the end that always stands out for me, as Nine finally gets a win without losing anyone. The elation the Doctor feels is perfectly portrayed by Eccleston.
  3. “I Think You Need a Doctor” (The Parting of the Ways, Series 1) The Parting of the Ways is still one of the best finales we’ve had, and whatever you think of the whole Bad Wolf thing, the Doctor saving Rose by sacrificing his own life made for great television. Eccleston and Piper have never been better.
  4. “The Missus and the Ex, Welcome to Every Man’s Worst Nightmare” (School Reunion, Series 2) Watching Mickey taunt the Doctor as Rose and Sarah Jane get in a right spat with each other was downright hilarious. Who has given us some comedy gold over the years, particularly with Bill in Series 10, but for me, Rose and Sarah’s sparky banter is the highlight humour-wise.
  5. “I Believe in Her” (The Satan Pit, Series 2) One of my favourite two-parters, Matt Jones’ horror-fantasy introduced the Ood, but its the Satanic Beast itself that makes this stand out. Ten comes face to face with something he can’t explain and which rocks his own beliefs, but in the end, his faith in Rose gives him the confidence to beat the Beast at its own game and send it plunging into a black hole. An episode so good, it could have easily worked as a season finale.
  6. “Wait, That’s Not Cybermen!” (Army of Ghosts, Series 2) Most of the time, you see the show’s major cliffhangers coming. Either they’re teased so obviously in trailers or so heavily foreshadowed that you can guess what’s coming. Not so in season, where the appearance of the Daleks in a Cybermen-led finale caught everyone off-guard. One of the best twists Who has ever pulled off.
  7. “Rose, Hold On!” (Doomsday, Series 2) We knew Rose was leaving, and the show was hinting pretty heavily she would die, so this scene really put everyone on edge. With the Doctor stuck on the other side of the room, Rose desperately hangs on to a lever as the Daleks and Cybermen are sucked into the void. Pete’s last second rescue may be convenient, but Rose’s separation from the Doctor is no less tragic for it.
  8. “YANA” (Utopia, Series 3) The first of several Master reveal moments on this list, Professor Yana’s transformation into the malevolent master is pulled off with great panache, and Derek Jacobi owns the role better in 3 minutes than some actors have in several series. Russell T Davies sure knows how to write cliffhangers!
  9. “Why Don’t You Ask Her Yourself?” (The Stolen Earth, Series 4) I still think Rose’s return was a mistake, but this scene was so good it was almost worthwhile. Ten’s reaction to seeing her again is spot on, and the Dalek ruining proceedings leads to one of the series’ most memorable cliffhangers. Pity Journey’s End didn’t match up to this.
  10. “Gadget Gadget” (The Waters of Mars) The Whole Time Lord Victorious sequence is glorious, but this special’s standout moment has to be the Doctor rescuing the survivors of Bowie Base One using nothing but a funny robot and his TARDIS. Murray Gold’s bombastic score really gets the pulse racing too.
  11. “It’s My Honour” (The End of Time, Part 2) This was just tragic. The Doctor survives the Master and the Timelords, only to be undone by Wilfred Mott. Tennant is on his best form as he rages against the injustice of it all, but in the end, he saves Wilfred at the cost of his own life. Ten at his heroic and tragic best.
  12. “I Don’t Want to Go” (The End of Time, Part 2) Heart-breaking. Whatever the flaws of the End of Time, the last 30 mins of the two-parter is perfect, and Tennant knocks it out of the park with this last line. An Unforgettable Exit.
  13. “Hello, I’m the Doctor. Basically… Run!” (The Eleventh Hour, Series 5) Smith’s debut is great from start to finish, but his conversation with the Atraxi, in which he scares them off using only his own legend, is the highlight. The way clips of the previous Doctors are used before Smith walks through Tennant’s image is awesome.
  14. “Guess Who, Ha!” (The Pandorica Opens, Series 5) Matt Smith had some great speeches to get his teeth into during his time on who, but his Pandorica one is arguably the best of the bunch, as the Doctor rails against an entire armada of spaceships despite having practically nothing except himself to take them on with.
  15. “Listen To Me!” (The Pandorica Opens, Series 5) As cliffhangers go, I don’t think the one from the Pandorica Opens will ever be beaten. The TARDIS explodes with River inside, Auton Rory stabs Amy, the universe implodes and an alliance of Daleks, Cybermen, Sontarans and more seals the Doctor in the Pandorica. No matter how many times I’ve seen it, it still makes my hair stand on end.
  16. “WHERE. IS. MY. WIFE?” (A Good Man Goes to War, Series 6) Rory got more character development than arguably any other companion in the shows history, and this intro to the mid-season finale shows just how far he’s come. Facing down a squadron of cybermen as the Doctor blows up their fleet in the background, this scene is just so much awesomeness.
  17. “Together, Or Not At All” (The Angels Take Manhattan, Series 7) Rory and Amy were two of the Doctor’s longest serving characters (only Clara and Rose are anywhere near them) and their exit was an emotional rollercoaster from start to finish. This scene, where Amy refuses to risk Rory’s life unless hers is also on the line, was a great final moment for the couple.
  18. “No Sir, All Thirteen!” (The Day of the Doctor) If this isn’t one of the best moments in Who history, I don’t know what is. It is the jewel in the crown of the 50th Anniversary special, with great dialogue, kick-ass music and a whole load of amazing cameos (including a shock one from Capaldi!). Simply awe-inspiring.
  19. “I Never Forget a Face” (The Day of the Doctor) Damn it. Just when you thought the 50th had used up it’s lot of shock cameos, it goes and drops Tom Baker in our laps. Baffling yet Brilliant, Confusing yet Charming, Tom’s role as ‘The Curator’ allows him to show one last time why, for many fans (including me) he was the best actor ever to play the role.
  20. Clara leaves the Doctor (Kill the Moon, Series 8) Whatever you thought of Clara as a companion (I bloody love her), you have to admit Jenna Coleman is a hell of an actress. Her tirade against the Doctor for abandoning her during a real crisis moment was a stunning scene, and its hard not to side with her here. No wonder her career’s taken off post-Who.
  21. “Couldn’t Keep Calling Myself ‘The Master’ Now Could I?” (Dark Water, Series 8) What is it with the Master and dramatic reveals? The Missy Mystery worked very well in Series 8, and the pay-off here is as good as it gets. Michelle Gomez was unforgettable in the role, and I hope Chibnall can come up with some new villains who will prove as much of a challenge for the Doctor as she did.
  22. “I Will Be Brave” (Face the Raven, Series 9) Clara’s swansong in Hell Bent may not be perfect, but her initial exit here is heart-breaking and perfectly played by Capaldi and Coleman. I wish Moffat hadn’t messed with this exit.
  23. “That’s One Hell of a Bird” (Heaven Sent, Series 9) This is up there with the best of them. Capaldi’s marvellous single-hander was one of the boldest, most unique episodes the series has ever come up with, and the Doctor punching his way through an Azbantium Wall was a thrilling conclusion. The combo of Moffat’s writing, Rachel Talalay’s direction and Capaldi’s acting is a definite winner.
  24. “Hello Missy. I’m the Master” (World Enough and Time, Series 10) We all knew it was coming, but it was done with such gusto we didn’t care. John Simm got better material in 2 minutes than he did in the entirety of the End of Time. A real punch the air moment if there ever was one.
  25. “Well, Here We Go, the Long Way Round” (Twice Upon a Time) David Bradley captured the spirit of William Hartnell perfectly in this Xmas Special, and his recreation of the first Doctor’s regeneration scene was a really heart-wrenching moment. So much so that it arguably overshadowed Capaldi’s exit a few minutes later. Murray Gold’s score reminds us exactly why he kept the job of composer for so long!

Well that’s my list. The great thing about this show is that I’m sure anyone reading this will be able to come up with plenty of their own favourites – it always has something for everyone. Let’s hope Jodie and Chibnall can add plenty to those lists!

My Top Games of 2017

As usual for late December, here’s my take on my favourite games I’ve been playing this year. As always, some games weren’t 2017 releases but ones I’ve only just got around to this year. It’s not been a vintage year for gaming (Mass Effect: Andromeda and Star Wars Battlefront 2 both fell short of the mark for different reasons) but there’s still been some really fun entries. So here’s my top 6 and, as a bonus, my favourite bit of DLC too!

6: Guardians of the Galaxy: A Telltale Series

Telltale games may not be your thing if your main focus is gameplay (or graphics for that matter), but for story and character values they always excel. Having breathed new life into the Borderlands series and told interesting tales in the Batman and Game of Thrones universes, they’ve now turned their hands to the Guardians of the Galaxy series. I’ll forewarn film fans that this isn’t tied to the Marvel Film adaptions – the characters are the same, but aren’t voiced by the same actors nor do they look all that similar. But that isn’t an annoyance, as it allows the game makers to push the characters further than they have been in the film series. As you’d except with the Guardians, the dialogue options are often hilarious, but its the strength of the storyline that will grip you. As well as delving into Quill, Rocket, Gamora and Drax’s backstories, the 5 episode series features run-ins with Thanos, the Nova Corp, The Collector’s agents and newcomer Hela the Accuser, a Kree warrior who serves as the main antagonist. Choices in Telltale games often feel emotionally tied to characters rather than having a major impact on the overall plot, but there’s a few here that have lasting impact on the way the last two episodes play out (including whether Nebula and Mantis join the Guardians). Overall the story and characterisation make this a good entry in the series, if admittedly not a perfect one, as the quick-time events are very mixed in quality (they aren’t particularly difficult, and while the melee combat is good enough the shooting mechanics are terrible). I still enjoyed it enough though for it to scrape into sixth place on my list.

Rating: 3.5 out of 5

5: Uncharted: The Lost Legacy (PS4 Exclusive). Uncharted 4 may have wrapped up Nathan Drake’s story, but given how much of a success the series has been for Naughty Dog, it seemed inevitable that a spin-off would turn up. So does the series work without its leading man? Er – yeah, of course it does. Chloe Frazer was one of the reasons Uncharted 2 remains the highlight of the series, so having her headline the 1st spin-off was a superb choice, and the less predictable pairing of her and Nadine Ross (i.e. one of the villains from A Thief’s End) works wonderfully. The game isn’t perfect – the first few levels are by-the-numbers and a touch slow, but once you get to the open-world (yes really) area of chapter 4, the game really starts to come to life. The combat is pretty much the same as Uncharted 4, with the only major addition being the ability to use C4 late game. The treasure/collectable hunting is as good as ever and the game is visually stunning (there’s a reason a screenshot from it is my current screensaver). Unlike previous uncharted games, the action takes place in only one country, India, giving it a different feel to earlier games (there’s a big focus on Indian History, Religion and Mythology – replacing the supernatural elements featured in games 1-3 and the pirate storyline from 4). Asav is a workable but not particular memorable villain, though the boss fight with him is challenging. While I agree with other reviewers that the game can sometimes seem like ‘Uncharted’s Greatest Hits’, for the most part its its own beast, and Chloe and Nadine’s turbulent but ultimately engaging relationship coupled with the stunning setting means its well worth your time (and money).

Rating: 4 out of 5

4: Injustice 2 – DC’s track record of making good video games is still intact even if its film efforts are still falling short. Injustice 2’s improved graphics and combat and its enlarged character roster make it worth the upgrade from Gods Among Us. The story mode is fun, and the multiverse events mean there’s basically hundreds of hours worth of gameplay on offer here – and that’s without factoring in the multiplayer modes. Yes the games currency and loot systems aren’t perfect, but they are far from the confusing, cash-grabbing disaster of some games we could mention (cough *Battlefront II*). It can get a little repetitive after a while, but the wide range of characters with different special moves mean its easy to switch things up a bit. Overall a great 1v1 fighting game that certainly gives you your money’s worth.

Rating: 4 out of 5

3: F1 2017 – The latest F1 sim improves on its impressive predecessor in basically every way. It adds two new practice programmes (Race strategy and fuel saving) ensuring that completing all three practice sessions is actually worthwhile, and completely rejigs the R&D tree, so you can no longer get 80% of the upgrades just from one successful season, which makes numerous seasons with the same team actually worthwhile. The difficulty slider is far less rigid that last year – you can now select any level between 1 and 100, which makes small changes possible and gets rid of the large jumps between difficulty levels that lessened my enjoyment of the 2016 edition. The best addition is the championships mode, which allows you to drive classic F1 cars from the 80’s, 90’s and 2000’s in a variety of short championships (hot lap championships, reverse grids events, sprint races, endurance races etc.) which is also an easy way to settle into the game and find what difficulty level is best for you. Overall, the game is a refined, polished version of its predecessor, which barring a few minor quibbles (overtaking can be a bit too easy on lower difficulty or with driver aids on, the safety car periods do drag on a bit) has delivered a great sim for any F1 fan. Worth the upgrade from any previous version.

Rating: 4.5 out of 5

2: Skyrim Special Edition – While the Special Edition doesn’t add much beyond vastly improved graphics, it fixes a lot of annoyances the original had (loading times have been cut to about 10% of what they were, while game-ending crashes are now far-rarer if still an occasional factor). Ultimately its worth a £20 upgrade if you liked the original but got frustrated with those issues, never brought the DLC for the original (the Special Edition includes all 3 expansion packs, including the sublime Dawnguard) or want to try out some mods without buying the PC edition. As I did a full review on this already, I won’t say much more, save that Skyrim is still as fun as ever, and with no new Elder Scrolls game in sight yet, this might be a fun way of getting back into the series.

Rating: 4.5 out of 5

1: Horizon Zero Dawn (PS4 Exclusive) – There was only going to be one game that could get the top spot this year. It may not be absolutely perfect (the difficulty of individual missions can jump about a bit, the new game plus mode isn’t really necessary), but it’s bloody close and more inventive that anything else on the market (seriously, if uncharted and the last of us weren’t already enough reason for PC/Nintendo/Xbox gamers to get a PS4 on the side, this is). In what was a bad year for Sci-Fi on television (excluding Black Mirror) Horizon Zero Dawn delivered one of the most compelling science fiction storylines I’ve seen in YEARS. But then again, to quote Honest Trailers ‘it takes a shit-ton of plotting to make tribal girl vs. Robot dinosaurs make sense’. Yep its that game. Set on a post-apocalyptic earth where human tribes have lost almost all knowledge of technology and are forced to survive in an oddly tranquil but dangerous environment which is roamed by robotic dinosaurs and other mechanical constructs. But as the game’s labyrinthine story unfolds, both the nature of the apocalypse (no its not a fallout-esque nuclear war) and the reasons for the dinosaurs creation (nope not aliens or anything stupid like that) become clear and are, in a way, strikingly and terrifyingly plausible in the same way some Black Mirror plotlines about rogue technology can be. The storyline is also anchored by main character Aloy, a tribal girl searching for the simple answers (who she really is and who her parents were) who is both an immensely likeable lead and probably the best new videogame character from 2017. The game’s missions range from taking down bandit camps, hunting down a mysterious sun cult, killing rogue robots and exploring ancient ruins to uncover clues (holograms, recordings, notes etc.) about the apocalypse. The robots range from the small scale Watcher and Grazer to the mighty Behemoth and Bellowbacks. While early levels feature foes you can take down with basic bows and spears, later levels see you having to employ everything from bomb slings and tripwires to shock arrows and mines to take down the humungous beasts. Part RPG (open world setting, optional side missions, various dialogue choices and upgrade options) part linear survival/stealth, it looks wonderful, is really fun to play and is extremely engaging. Add the Frozen Wilds DLC if you want an extra challenge.

Rating: 5 out of 5

And my favourite DLC is…

  1. Far Harbor (Fallout 4). Far Harbor is a rarity – a DLC that’s actually better and more engaging than the main game. Fallout DLC’s are often hit-and-miss, but Far Harbor absolutely nails what you want from a DLC: a new, exciting location to explore, new, challenging enemies and a good central storyline to get into. The location for this DLC is an island north of the main commonwealth that is covered in radioactive fog, making exploration of the monster infested island dangerous. It also adds three new major factions: a Synth refuge, the Children of Atom, and the Islanders themselves, who have been pushed back to one measly settlement by the fog and the monsters. The main storyline is engaging and it isn’t clear cut what the optimum moral choice is: the Islanders aren’t always sympathetic, the Synth leader has a pretty immoral past and not all of the Children of Atom are the antagonistic zealots their leaders are. The game gives you a lot of scope for resolving the conflict between the three factions (you can destroy the Children of Atom, allow the fog to overrun the island and kill the Islanders, make peace between the three factions or even call in the Brotherhood or Institute from the main game to wipe out the Synths). The side quests are also good, whether it be slaying the islands wide variety of mutated sea-creatures, helping out the various settlements or playing detective in a vault filled with Robobrains (one of the weirdest and most fun questlines). Far Harbor also avoids several of the pratfalls which weakened the main game: the crafting system plays a minimal role and is far less annoying than usual, while there are three major settlements to align with and do quests for, which is actually more than the main game gave us (let’s be honest, any settlement outside of Goodneighbor and Diamond City sucked in the main game). Overall, this might just be the best DLC a fallout game has given us, even if its attached to one of the weaker entries in the fallout series.

Rating: 5 out of 5!

Hopefully 2018 will be a stronger year for games. With the new Spider-Man, Vampyr, Days Gone and maybe even Last of Us Part 2, it looks pretty promising…

Top 10 TV Episodes of 2017

Rather than my usual top TV shows, I decided to do a top 10 episodes. This was for several reasons: firstly, a lot of my favourite shows have underperformed this year (House of Cards, Doctor Who, The Americans, The Flash), and a top 4 shows would be about the best I could manage, and secondly because many of those shows still had terrific episodes even if the overall season was a bit of a let-down. So without further ado, here’s my TV picks from 2017.

I’ve made any spoilers as minor as possible, but pretty much everything referenced here was either in trailers or has been general knowledge for at least 6 months.

10. World Enough and Time (Doctor Who, Series 10) Series 10 may have been a weak run for Doctor Who, but Steven Moffat’s writing, Capaldi and Mackie’s acting and Rachel Talalay’s direction was flawless throughout. World Enough and Time is up their with Moffat’s best: a dark, creepy haunting tale set on a spaceship stuck orbiting a black hole, causing time to run faster at one end than the other. Throw Missy, a classic monster and another returning (disguised) villain into the mix and you have a classic in the making. If only so much of it hadn’t been spoiled beforehand, this episode might have been a lot further up my list.

9. Season Finale (Robot Wars UK) The last series of Robot Wars had 1 or 2 duff episodes, but the finale was so spectacular that it has to get a place in my top 10. The ten way Robot Rumble to decide who got the coveted sixth spot in the final was perhaps the best 5 minutes of television this series has ever produced, and the sheer chaos of it all was wonderful to behold. The final rounds themselves weren’t bad either – with several surprises as Defending Champions Carbide were placed under extreme pressure and a few no-hopers (Nuts 2) actually acquitted themselves rather well.

8. Beyond the Wall (Game of Thrones, Season 7) Game of Thrones seventh season may have thrown out the careful plotting a bit too much for some fans, but the sheer spectacle of the thing and the wonderful array of character interactions (some we’d waited years to see) still made it insanely compelling viewing. This episode, where Jon Snow and a band of followers including the Brotherhood without banners, The Hound, Tormund, Jorah and Gendry, all venture North of the Wall to search for proof of the White Walkers existence, is on a scale worthy of Lord of the Rings. To say any more would spoil what’s so great about it, but the soundtrack, direction and spectacle were all second to none, even if the resolution is somewhat ludicrous.

7. The Gentle Art of Making Enemies (Gotham, Season 3) Gotham’s not had a great year by all accounts. While we’ve had several great villains truly come to the fore (Riddler, Ra’s al Ghul, Professor Pyg) there’s been too much slow-burning about Gotham, and too many characters have got short-shift. But every so often, the show delivers a real gem, and that’s exactly what we got in this, the third part of a trilogy marking Jerome’s return in season 3. Seeing teenage Bruce Wayne face off with the man Gotham fans are 99% sure is the future Joker was stunning television, and the whole Riddler-Penguin civil war wasn’t a bad B-Plot either. It has a lot of great Bruce and Jerome moments that I won’t spoil, and one hell of a cliffhanger too.

6. The Dragon and the Wolf (Game of Thrones, Season 7) Remember what I said about character interactions? Well the finale had a truck full of them. Whether it was the Hound and Brienne coming face-to-face again, Jon Snow and Daenerys finally meeting Cersei or Jaime finally, FINALLY seeing Cersei’s true colours, it was epic. Littlefinger’s plotline was a punch the air moment for every fan watching, and the final scene with the White Walkers sets up season 8 perfectly. A great finale, if not quite the best episode of the season…

5. Doomworld (Legends of Tomorrow, Season 2) – I would never have expected Legends of Tomorrow, the most ridiculous Superhero Show on TV (featuring time-travel, aliens, mythology etc.) to also have been the best and most consistent one in 2017. But it was. Mainly because of its amazing season 2 plotline, which saw the superhero ensemble face-off with the Legion of Doom (featuring the Reverse-Flash, Dark Archer, Damien Darhk and Captain Cold – aka four of the Arrowverse’s best villains). Doomworld gave us a look at a future where the villains actually won, a rarity on any superhero show, and was a fabulous hour full of redemption stories, villainous one-liners and a kick-ass final battle scene. If season 3 lives up to this standard I won’t be complaining much.

4. Infantino Street (The Flash, Season 3) I’ll be honest, the Flash’s third season was terrible. The main plot didn’t work well and it largely squandered any goodwill left over from the excellent first one and a half seasons. Infantino Street was its sole knockout hit, the penultimate episode of the season, which featured both the return of fan-favourite Leonard Snart and had the villainous Savitar finally delivering on his potential. The ending scene is up their with the best Flash cliffhangers (and there are A LOT of good ones). Pity the producers ruined everything in the season finale, but in my view that doesn’t diminish this classic instalment. Let’s hope season 4 has more episodes like this.

3. Storm-y Weather (Orange is the New Black, Season 5) Orange is the New Black’s status as one of the all-time great Netflix shows remains untarnished (unlike House of Cards, for various reasons), and season five continuing the trend of a series that has actually got better year on year (how many shows can say that?!). Set over 3 days rather than several weeks a la previous series, season 5 gave us a gripping depiction of a prison riot and what happens when the inmates turn the tables on the awful prison officers. This episode (the finale) finally forced the prisoners (and bastard guardsman Piscatella) to face up to their actions and face the consequences. Filled with emotional performances, it confirms that this series really does have longeveity. The use of the ‘To Build a Home’ song over the last 5 mins really was something beautiful too.

2. Lian Yu (Arrow, Season 5) – Season Five finally broke the norm for Arrow finales (i.e. a yearly attack on Star City) and instead presented a much more personal, visceral conflict between Oliver Queen and Prometheus, leading to a monumental battle between both sides (including the whole of team Arrow, Black Siren and several recurring fan favourites). Even the flashbacks were great, as Oliver faced off with a brutal Russian terrorist (played menacingly by Dolph Lungren). Throw in a spectacular cliffhanger and this was by miles the best episode Arrow’s given us since Deathstroke unleashed his army in season 2. A truly terrific finale.

1. The Spoils of War (Game of Thrones, Season 7) – It had to be really. The Spoils of War is a contender for best Thrones episode of all time. It contains a lot of fan-favourite moments and a truly awesome battle scene. Arya training with Brienne is just the icing on the cake. The finale builds and builds to something truly special as we finally see just what those Dragons are really capable of… A masterpiece, and the best episode of TV I’ve seen in a long time.

And here’s my TV Awards for 2017

Best Actress: Melissa Benoist (Supergirl)
Best Actor: Nikolau Coster-Waldau (Jaime Lannister, Game of Thrones)
Best Supporting Actress: Michelle Gomez (Missy, Doctor Who)
Best Supporting Actor: Wentworth Miller (Snart, The Flash/Legends of Tomorrow)
Best TV Show: Game of Thrones/Orange is the New Black
Best Script: Steven Moffat (World Enough and Time, Doctor Who)
Best Director: Rachel Talalay (World Enough and Time, Doctor Who)
Best Special Effects: USS Callister (Black Mirror)
Best Composer: Blake Neely (Arrow, Flash, Supergirl, Legends of Tomorrow)
Best Villain(s): The Legion of Doom (Legends of Tomorrow)
Best Hero: Jon Snow (Game of Thrones)
Worst Actress: Sonequa Martin-Green (Star Trek Discovery)
Worst Actor: Doug Jones (Star Trek Discovery)
Worst Director: Charles Palmer (Oxygen, Doctor Who)
Worst TV Show: Star Trek Discovery
Worst Script: Aaron Helbing and Todd Helbing (Finish Line, The Flash)

My Top 10 TV Shows of 2016

I only did a top 5 last year but I felt I’d watched considerably more this time, so a top 10 seemed more appropriate.

Minor spoilers for all shows – no real specifics though, don’t worry.

10. Gotham (Season 2 Part 2/Season 3 Part 1) Gotham has often been considered the problem child of the DC universe – it isn’t part of the Arrowverse or the movies and thus sits awkwardly in the middle. Its tone tends to be wildly uneven – one episode gave us the hilariously OTT ending of Butch blowing up a villain with a Bazooka while another had the incredibly tense sequence where the Mad Hatter forced Jim to choose which of his two love interests was shot. However, this year has seen arguably its best run of episodes yet, with a superb Mr. Freeze origin story, a very sweet romance between the teenage Bruce and Selina, a great main villain in season 3 in the Mad Hatter and the winning combination of Penguin and Riddler, who are arguably the best villains on any superhero show right now. The show has miss-stepped a fair few times (the godawful Gordon in prison episode, two lacklustre season finales) but overall its showing great promise, and the first six episodes of season 3 were simply amazing.

9. The Grand Tour (Series 1) Clarkson, Hammond and May’s return may be a mixed bag of the hilarious and the cringe worthy, but overall its been a very welcome addition as well as the main reason to fork out for Amazon Prime. There’s been a few duff moments (particularly in the second episode ‘Operation Desert Stumble) but overall its given us all of the comedy, cars and catastrophe we wanted. It goes without saying, its completely trounced (and savagely mocked) the travesty/pile of excrement which was the Chris Evans version. Serves the BBC right.

8. IZombie (Season 2 Part 2) Anyone who’s not tried IZombie due to the stupid sounding title should really give it a second thought. The unique plotline it has (Zombies gain temporary memories/personality traits from the brains they eat, which allows main character Liv to solve the murders of people who end up in the morgue she works in) really opens up a wealth of storytelling potential, while also leading to some great comedy (the episodes where Liv eats the brain of an erotic novelist spring to mind, though there’s plenty of others with great comedy from similar ideas). The second half of season two in particular ramps up the drama element as more of the main cast find out about Liv’s true nature and the company that created the Zombie outbreak comes under the spotlight. Roll on season 3!

7. The Great British Bake Off (The final series that anyone will bother watching) Second only to the terrible Top Gear reboot in the list of BBC cock-ups this year was the loss of Bake Off to Channel 4 (seriously, who the fuck will watch it with no Mel, Sue, Mary as well as having to put up with sodding ad-breaks). I may have been a late-comer to the series, but the sheer charm of it all won me over and as it is it’s unofficial swansong, I thought i’d include it in my list. Full of the brilliant Mel/Sue interplay with the contestants, lavish desserts and culinary disasters (Andrew forgetting to put the oven on was hilarious) it also gave us a real character in Selasi (to cool to put into words) contestants who were easy to root for in Andrew and Benjamina and my personal favourite, pout-queen Candice Brown (too sweet for words – simply adored her!). This series was the perfect send off to a teatime treat of a show.

6. Legends of Tomorrow (Season 1 Part 2/Season 2 Part 1) The Arrow/Flash spinoff took a few episodes to get going in 2015, but it blew it out of the park in 2016 and surpassed both its parent shows (I sense a pattern emerging – expect Supergirl to be high on this list next year!). The first season gave us a thrilling climax as the team contended with the time masters and Vandal Savage, and the second gave us one of the best supervillain team ups in history as Malcolm Merlyn, the Reverse Flash and Damien Darhk joined forces (Legion of Doom!!!) It also has some of the most colourful characters from the Arrowverse in anti-heroes Snart and Mick (Captain Cold and Heatwave), Captain Rip played by Rory from Doctor Who!! (usually amusingly muttering ‘oh bloody hell…’ as the teams plans fall apart every week) and Sara/White Canary, who continues to be one of my favourite superhero characters (who else can seduce both the Queen of France and girls in Salem in the same episode? Her becoming temporary captain also really gave her character some great material this year. A very silly superhero show, but isn’t that just what we need after 2016?

5. Black Mirror (Series 3) The first of 3 Netflix series in my top 5, Black Mirror’s move from channel 4 to Netflix looks increasingly inspired. Not only has it got rid of ad-breaks and freed up the episodes running time, but increasing the series length to 6 episodes seems to have improved the quality rather than detracted from it. Even weaker episodes like ‘Playtest’ are still worth watching, while there’s some classically dark instalments with clever stings in the tail like ‘Shut Up and Dance’, for those who want more of what series 1 and 2 gave us, as well as new concepts and episode formats. The highlight for me, has to be ‘San Junipero’, sad and heartwarming in equal measure and a very neat sci-fi idea. Overall though, its a sublime run of episodes and well worth your time.

4. Game of Thrones (Season 6) Thrones might not have had a particularly consistent run of episodes (a real slow-burner mid-season with a bit too much padding, particularly in the Arya and King’s Landing storylines) but who cares when it still gave us exactly what we wanted in a kick-ass and explosive finale, a scintillating clash between Jon Snow and Ramsay, Daenerys being awesome for the first time in a while and the sheer horror of the white walkers attack leading to the tearjerking ‘Hold the Door’ moment. If season 7 can keep up the work of episodes like ‘Home’, ‘Battle of the Bastards’ or ‘The Winds of Winter’, then we’re sitting pretty for a thrilling penultimate series.

3. Orange is the New Black (Season 4) Orange is the New Black has got stronger every season and the fourth series doesn’t buck the trend. Despite being arguably one of the darkest series we’ve had from the scriptwriters, it balanced comedy and tragedy as effectively as ever. Any series that combines tear-jerking mental health plotlines and that horrifying twist at the end of episode 12 with laugh out loud moments such as the unlikeliest threesome probably ever seen on TV (I won’t spoil it, its so much better if you aren’t expecting it) is clearly onto a winner. Well done OITNB, yet again you’ve been one of the Netflix highlights this year. Just not as good as…

2. House of Cards (Season 4) After a mixed third season, House of Cards turned things around and delivered what may be its best season so far. Kevin Spacey and Robin Wright’s acting was first class as always, but this time the writing was on par with their performances as the shows version of the US presidential election provided great drama and plenty of shock narrative twists. The way they utilised characters from previous seasons like ex-president Walker, Lucas Goodwin and Raymond Tusk was both expertly done and a real treat for long-term fans. I’ll credit them for not simply caricaturing Trump and Clinton either, instead giving us Joel Kinnaman’s Republican candidate Will Conway who seems like the ideal potential president, but has weaknesses/flaws that become apparent over the season, and was a far more engaging type of figure for Francis to face off with as he was continually at a PR disadvantage. Bring on season 5!

1.The Americans (Season 4) The most consistent series on television was a stand-out this year as the Russian spy pair/American married couple dealt with more problems than ever before as their lives increasingly teetered on the edge of unravelling. Dylan Baker was the stand-out guest star as a Soviet sympathiser working in an American viral lab, while the main cast was as great as ever, particularly Matthew Rhys, Keri Russell, Frank Langella and Alison Wright. The Jennings had to deal with their daughter’s struggle to accept their true identity, the loss of one of their closest informants and missions they worth becoming increasingly uncomfortable with. A slightly lacklustre season finale aside, it was a flawless run with several shock character exits and plot twists, can’t wait for the final two seasons of this thrilling if slow-burning drama.

Missing out on the list was Arrow (still rebuilding after a so-so year), Flash (ditto, Zoom was the most disappointing villain I’ve seen from DC’s TV universe), Red Dwarf (promising but not back to its best yet) and Jessica Jones (too much padding). There are some shows I haven’t got round to watching yet (Supergirl and Westworld for example) and some I just don’t watch (like Walking Dead).

As for the disappointments of the year, my worst offenders have to be the Chris Evans Top Gear (for obvious reasons – what a TWAT!), Doctor Who spin-off Class (very pointless – even Torchwood Series 1 was less awkward) and Luke Cage, which completely wasted its potential and contrived to make sure whichever style of show you like, you would hate half the season. (Congrats Marvel, you have made something worse than Agents of Shield… can’t you just give us Jessica Jones season 2 already?!)

My TV Awards 2016

Best Actor: Matthew Rhys (The Americans)
Best Actress: Krysten Ritter (Jessica Jones)/Robin Wright (House of Cards)
Best Supporting Actor: David Tennant (Jessica Jones)
Best Supporting Actress: Lori Petty (Orange is the New Black)
Best Episode: The Winds of Winter (Game of Thrones)
Best Hero: Sara Lance (Legends of Tomorrow)
Best Villain: Ramsay Snow (Game of Thrones)
Best Scripting: The Americans
Best Direction: Black Mirror
Best Soundtrack: Game of Thrones

If you’ve got your own list or disagree with mine, feel free to comment below. Happy New Year!