Category Archives: Series Review

Article: Why the Flash has become the worst of the DC TV shows.

From Hero to Zero

Warning: Contains Spoilers for seasons 1-3 of The Flash and Seasons 4/6 of Arrow

It’s generally been a good year for the DC TV shows. Legends of Tomorrow, Gotham and Black Lightning have all had great seasons. Supergirl’s third season has so far been by far the strongest in the shows history. Even Arrow managed to have a strong end to an otherwise bland and uninspired run. But while reviewers have hit arrow hard, its arguably the Flash that deserves the most scorn.

The flash’s first season back in 2014/15 was one of the strongest the Arrowverse had ever delivered. The first half of season two kept that momentum going, but then things started to go downhill after the mid-season break. Zoom didn’t work as a lead villain once he took his mask off, and the Earth-2 dopplegangers were so thinly drawn and one-note I don’t know why they bothered with them. Still, while not a triumph, season 2 still had plenty of good to balance out one or two issues. Then season three happened. Flashpoint remains the moment the Flash lost something it could never recover: quality and fanbase goodwill. It was done TERRIBLY and made Barry far, FAR too unlikable. But that was only the tip of the iceberg.

Season 3 had a multitude of problems. H.R. was the least interesting Wells incarnation and took a long time to come into his own. Too many filler episodes were bland and were merely used to drag out the season’s main plot far longer than it deserved. The whole ‘Gorilla City’ two-parter ended on a whimper rather than an adrenaline rush. Jessie was completely wasted in a thankless role that mainly revolved around being Wally’s love interest, despite looking far more capable as a speedster than either Wally or Barry at times. The Killer Frost plotline was predictable, lacked nuance and was resolved far too easily in the season finale. And then we have Savitar. The reveal of his identity took far too long, which backfired as, by the time it happened, we’d all worked out who he was anyway. Not to mention he was the third speedster villain in a row, which led to a whole feeling of ‘really, again?’ about proceedings. Not to mention his grand plan made even less sense than Zoom’s, which is saying something. Don’t get me wrong, season 3 had some great episodes (The Present, Dead or Alive, The Wrath of Savitar, Duet and Infantino Street) but it also had a finale that sucked so badly, that I gave up on the show.

I kept an eye on reviews of season 4 to see if was worth giving the show another shot. The reviews seemed unanimous – no it wasn’t. Even though there were clearly some good episodes, clips I’ve seen and the plot summaries clearly show the key issues I have with the show are either still there or have got worse, and even Den of Geek, who defended Season 3, seem to have lost patience. Hence why for the first time, the Flash must be considered the worst DC show on TV. And this can be blamed on 5 separate issues:

1. The Quality of the Villains dropped. 

The Flash did such a good job on its villains in Season 1 and 2 that it was always going to be hard to maintain that standard (Arrow has sometimes struggled with this as well but not to the same extent). Just think of S1 and S2’s villains: Reverse-Flash, Captain Cold, Weather Wizard, The Trickster, Gorilla Grodd. They were all great beyond measure. Sure, Zoom stopped being threatening the instant his mask came off, but he was an exception. Name one villain of the same quality in S3 or S4? Struggling? While Savitar and Devoe have clearly both had their moments, there wasn’t a single stand-out showing from the one-off or support villains. Mirror Master and Abracadabra disappointed, and the show seems to have run out of good villains from the comics to introduce. It’s not the showrunners fault that some of its best villains are no longer available (Snart’s become an anti-hero, the Reverse-Flash has been used too much for any major further appearances, Mark Hamill has been too busy with Star Wars to play the Trickster etc.) but its clear both that the Flash’s original villains have a tendency to run out of steam (Grodd’s S3 story was rubbish and he was beaten far too easily by Solivar) and that these villains work better on Legends of Tomorrow. I honestly don’t know how the Flash can fix this problem, but I’d have two main suggestions: 1. cut the episode number from 23 to 16/17 so there’s less weak filler episodes with throwaway villains. 2. Have more than one main villain per season. Then their plot won’t get stretched out so much.

2. Killer Frost has been severely mishandled

I wasn’t a fan of Earth-2 killer frost. She was a pretty one-note character who seemed to just be evil for the sake of it. So when Caitlin’s KF persona started manifesting on Earth-1, I hoped they might do it in a more nuanced way. While the first few episodes looked promising, once Killer Frost fully emerged she was exactly the same as her Earth-2 counterpart. This could still have worked if the show had shown the battle between the two personas in a more interesting way that just flicking between them when the plot called for it (for example, how Ed Nygma has struggled with his Riddler persona on Gotham). If Gotham has done a more convincing character arc than you, you know you’ve really f*cked this plotline up. Add in the predictable and all too easy change of heart Killer Frost had in the S3 finale, which was entirely unjustified (Arrow did a far better job of this in S6 with Black Siren, whose shifts in allegiance played out over several episodes and wasn’t always predictable). Again, if Arrow season 6 did something better than you… Season 4 hasn’t fixed the shows Killer Frost problem, and at this point I’m not sure they can – they made her too much of a pantomime/cartoon villain at the start for her to work effectively as a character now.

3. The show doesn’t use its supporting characters well

There’s a reason Wally buggered off to Legends of Tomorrow (where Keiynan Lonsdale has seemed far happier). He had so little to do since becoming a speedster other than back-up Barry, get beaten by Savitar and hang out with Jessie. The character was being wasted on the Flash, because the writers couldn’t figure out what to do with him. Jessie has had similarly short shift, appearing only in a few guest appearances that haven’t done her justice – her abilities as a speedster are clearly strong, so why they don’t bring her in more often (or at least let her be part of the crossovers) is beyond me. Again, the writers clearly don’t know what they’re doing with her character. It’s also becoming noticeable that the writers flat out refuse to ever kill one of the main cast (Barry, Iris, Joe, Cisco or Caitlin) so its always the supporting characters that get chopped, because the show clearly regards them as expendable (see Eddie, Ronnie, Henry Allen and H.R.). This leads to the supporting characters being chopped and changed too often for any of them to have a lasting impact or stronger character development. Even if they aren’t killed off, promising supporting characters are often written out despite being more interesting than the main cast (i.e. Patty and Julian, both of whom brought some fun and tension to the show that it badly needed but no longer possesses). I mean, I know Tom Felton probably has other things to do, but he was the best thing in season 3, so to lose him so quickly and without a proper send-off was downright annoying.

4. Barry has caused too much suffering to be a likeable lead anymore

The list of people who’ve died either for Barry or because of him is too long: – Eddie, his parents, Ronnie, H.R., Cisco’s brother. Not to mention all of the lives he impacted adversely with Flashpoint. Barry has never really paid the price for all that suffering, which is why season 3’s ending was so misguided. Had Barry lost Iris, it would have been the perfect reminder that Barry’s actions have consequences. It might have allowed the show to shake up the character in a big way. Instead, H.R. took the fall and Barry carried on as normal (his visible relief that it was H.R. not Iris REALLY pissed me off – that’s at least the 3rd person to sacrifice themselves to save you Barry, which is at least 2 too many). Barry doesn’t deserve a happy ending when so many others have lost theirs because of him. If Iris had died and he’d changed his ways (and then eventually gotten over it, perhaps ending up with Patty instead, it would have been far more interesting).

5. Iris.

I deliberately left Iris till last so this article doesn’t just get dismissed as another Iris hate forum. But even hardcore fans of the show have to realise, Iris has driven away a LOT of the fanbase. Even Laurel and Felicity on Arrow aren’t this annoying. But at least Laurel and Felicity’s roles on Arrow have always made sense. Laurel was a kick-ass lawyer and eventually trained herself into becoming a somewhat capable vigilante, but not one who ever magically became anywhere near as capable as Roy, Diggle or Thea, who’d all had much better training. Felicity has always been the super-hacker the team needs to get sh*t done, as well as trying to be the (irritating but necessary) voice of reason who keeps the team together. Both characters become more annoying over time, but both had character arcs that made sense.

Iris’ character arc has never made sense. Her initial role as a journalist/Eddie’s girlfriend worked well enough, but the whole journalist thing was never embraced in a convincing way after S2 (say as Kara’s is on Supergirl, where her human job has played a significant role at times). Worse, while Iris had plenty of chemistry with Eddie, she has rarely had as much with Barry, which undermines their whole relationship (I’m not blaming the actors – Grant Gustin and Candice Patton do what they can, but it rarely convinces). Her becoming the leader of Team Flash was the nail in the coffin. It smacks of being a girl-power statement rather than making any narrative sense (and I’m all for girl-power – Legends and Supergirl both have it in spades, but the difference that Sara, Amaya, Kara and Alex have all earned their roles as Captain/Superheroes/Secret Agent. They own those roles and make sense in them. Iris doesn’t and has never justified her elevation to such a role). It also smacks of just giving the character something to do rather than just be Barry’s fiancé/wife, which is fine, but she really should have just focused on the journalism, which would have made a lot more sense.

Finally, the big problem with Iris stems from the fact that Barry literally has more chemistry with virtually every other female cast member on the Flash. Him and Patty were perfect, him and Caitlin had a spark in S1, him and Kara were adorable in the crossovers and even Felicity would have worked better as a love interest. You can’t credibly pair up Barry and Iris in this scenario – the writers have only done it to be in line with the comics, not because its what’s best for the series.

Ultimately, I doubt I’ll ever go back to the Flash at this point except for crossover episodes. Unless they bring Julian back or kill Iris off, neither of which I can see happening, I don’t see the show improving enough to be worth the effort. Arrow may be on thin ice at the moment, but the Flash has already sunk into the depths, which is a crying shame.

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A Series of Unfortunate Events, Series 2 Review

Starring Neil Patrick Harris, Patrick Warburton, Malina Weissman and Louis Hynes

Spoiler Free

I loved the Series of Unfortunate Events books as a kid. Like many, I was slightly disappointed by the film adaptation starring Jim Carrey as Count Olaf, which lacked the soul of the original. While Series 1 of the more successful Netflix adaptation was undoubtedly a step up, it still wasn’t quite on par with the standard of the books. However, as books 1-4 weren’t exactly the best in the series, I was curious to see if the TV show would improve when adapting better material frim books 5-9. Has it? Sort of.

As with series 1, my main praise would have to go to the show’s cast and production. It looks amazing and you can’t really pick out a weak link in the cast. Neil Patrick Harris excels with most of his various guises (only Detective Dupin from a Vile Village is disappointing, and I’d blame that firmly on how poorly he’s written rather than Harris) and the Baudelaire’s actors keep the children easy to root for. The new additions to the supporting cast are generally great. Lucy Punch in some ways overshadows Harris as Esme Squalor, while Carmelita Spats is done absolutely perfectly in Austere Academy. Fellow newcomer Nathan Fillion also makes Jacques Snicket one of the best things in the first half of the season.

Unfortunately the writing isn’t always as spot on as the casting. While the series gets a strong start with Austere Academy and Ersatz Elevator, the Vile Village adaptation is resolutely dull. Hostile Hospital is watchable despite being based on one of the weakest books, while Carnivorous Carnival is a game of two halves (the first episode is great, the second not so much). I feel like one problem the series has is that the two episode per book structure is hamstringing some of the more slow-paced books, like Vile Village, as the increased focus on the Volunteers and the Villains forces the show to condense a lot of what the children got up to in the books. Books fans might also be perplexed by one or two changes from the novels (for example, two of Olaf’s henchmen who died in books 8 and 9 are inexplicably still alive at the end of series 2, for no apparent reason).

While there’s a lot of fun to be had from the performances, I still feel like this show doesn’t know exactly what it wants to be. It isn’t funny enough for a dark-humoured comedy and its tone isn’t dark enough (despite the subject matter) for it to be a great drama. Sure, it’s entertaining, but Olaf is still nowhere near as menacing as in the books, and you don’t feel tension anywhere near as often as the show seems to want you to.

In short, this is slightly better that series one, but only because it’s based off some of the better books, not because they’ve drastically improved things. So if you liked the first series, the second will happily give you more of the same. If the first series left you sceptical, the second won’t change your mind. Hopefully Series 3 can end this adaptation on a high, but I’ll be watching it for completionists’ sake, not because I consider it essential viewing.

Rating: 3.5 out of 5

Next up, I finally get around to reviewing Black Panther…

Jessica Jones Season 2 Review

Starring Krysten Ritter, Rachael Taylor, Eka Darville, Carrie-Anne Moss and Janet McTreer.

Warning: Minor Spoilers Follow for Season 2 and Major Spoilers for Season 1

Jessica Jones is easily the most interesting of Marvel’s TV superheroes. Her first season was gripping in a way that Luke Cage and Iron Fist never came close to. Yes, it was three episodes too long (like almost ALL Marvel Netflix productions – even the 8-episode Defenders had that problem) but for the most part it was very engaging stuff, helped immeasurably by Krysten Ritter’s tortured ‘not-a-heroine’ Jessica and David Tennant’s chilling villain Kilgrave. The series 1 finale saw Jessica finally get the upper hand and snap Kilgrave’s neck, which begged one obvious question: how the hell do you follow David Tennant as a villain?

Season 2’s answer is to have multiple antagonists. Between dickhead lawyer Pryce (Terry Chen), fellow Metahuman Alisa (Janet McTreer) and scientist Karl (the one who gave Jessica her powers) there’s a lot of potential bad guys floating around. But, unlike the black and white films Marvel is so fond of, there’s a lot of grey here. Jessica, Trish and Hogarth all go to some pretty dark places this season, while none of the villains are the out-and-out monster Kilgrave was. This helps keep the season somewhat unpredictable, even if none of the new characters come close to being as memorable as Tennant.

Fortunately, even if the show can’t live up to season 1’s villain, it does fix a lot of that season’s other problems. The pacing, while slow for the first few episodes, never feels padded out in the way season 1 was. There’s actually 12-13 episodes worth of story to tell here, not 8-10 stretched out like was the case last time. The show also cuts out some of the slack from season 1 (Simpson’s role in events is minimal but effective, Hogarth’s storyline actually leads somewhere) and develops the supporting characters a lot more (Trish and Malcolm have very different season long journeys, while the Jessica who comes out of episode 13 is definitely not the one we see in episode 1). The show also gives Jessica a new love interest who is a really good replacement for Luke, which I wasn’t expecting. The various plot twists don’t derail things the way they scuppered Luke Cage’s last season either, even if the mid-season twist is equally cliché.

Its not all good: the first episode is pretty dreadful, the season’s arc takes a while to become clear and Hogarth’s storyline isn’t always engaging, but overall I think I actually preferred this to season 1. Even if Tennant’s involvement is minimal, the season is much better structured and the production, direction and writing are all pretty consistently strong from episode 2 onwards. If you like darker, more meaningful superhero shows that feature actual detective work and real consequences, Jessica Jones is still the only Marvel offering worth looking at… well unless you happen to find Daredevil interesting (I don’t but I know plenty of people do).

Rating: 4 out of 5 (I gave the first season 3.5/5)

Next up: My review of the second season of ‘A Series of Unfortunate Events’. Or Black Panther if I finally find time to see it.

Stranger Things: Season 2 Review

Starring Winona Ryder, David Harbour, Finn Wolfhard, Millie Bobby Brown, Sean Astin and Paul Reiser.

TV shows tend to hit their stride a bit more in their second season than they did in their first run. This is true for everything from Doctor Who to Arrow to The Grand Tour. This tends to be because showrunners have the chance to look at the first series and iron out any obvious issues that annoyed fans or critics the first time round. The only reason shows can tend to be worse in their second season is if there have been substantial cast changes or there wasn’t a good enough story arc/idea to merit a sequel in the first place. Stranger Things’ cast remained consistent from Series 1, so its continued success was always going to be down to whether the showrunners had a good, clear idea of what the show should do going forward. Good news – they absolutely did.

The show hits the ground running pretty quickly compared to season 1. While the first two episodes mainly serve as exercise in introducing new characters (such as Max [Sadie Sink], a love interest for Dustin and Lucas, and Joyce’s new boyfriend, played by Sean Astin aka Samwise Gamgee) and seeing how the land lies after the events of the season 1 finale (Mike still waiting for Eleven, Nancy’s guilt over Barbara’s death, Will suffering from PTSD etc.) things pick up pretty quickly from episode 3 onwards. The cliffhangers feel more meaningful this time, particularly the ones in episodes 6 and 8. Episode 6’s cliffhanger is exacerbated by the fact that you have to wait a whole chapter to see the resolution, since episode 7 purely focuses on Eleven’s journey (yet still remains extremely engaging). There’s less annoying character moments this time as well (apart from Mike being a dick to Max, though given how much Eleven’s disappearance and Will’s trauma put him through this season its understandable). Paul Reiser (aka Burke from Aliens) also joins the cast as a government doctor at Hawkins lab, and it is pleasingly unclear for most of the season what his true morals/motivations are.

The shows’ production remains largely faultless. The music fits perfectly. The direction and effects mesh together nicely. The dialogue is never clunky or cringeworthy. There are more humorous moments than in season one. Their are less genre-based clichés this time (the government agency isn’t wholly evil for once). The storyline is engaging. If it wasn’t for the fact that you can see where most of the character arcs are headed (i.e. Eleven’s decision at the end of chapter 7/which of Dustin or Lucas that Max will end up with) and the sense that most of the characters are too important for the show to kill off (Will is the only one of the young cast you ever feel is in real danger, ditto Steve amongst the young adults) I’d have no issues with this show at all. However, while the predictability is a shame, rather like in Game of Thrones season 7, you’ll be having too much fun to really care.

Overall Stranger Things 2 is an improvement on the first series in almost every regard. The new cast members slot in seamlessly, the music and direction remain a standout, and the season hits its stride much earlier than the first one did. Only its predictability prevents me giving this a perfect rating.

Rating: 4.5 out of 5

My next review will probably be Jessica Jones season 2, followed by Black Panther when I finally get around to watching it.

Stranger Things Season 1 Review

Starring Winona Ryder, David Harbour, Finn Wolfhard and Millie Bobby Brown.

Minor Spoilers only. Everything mentioned is given away by an episode title or trailers.

So I finally got around to watching it. I don’t tend to binge watch many series (House of Cards and Orange is the New Black aside) but I watched the entirety of Season 1 on Tuesday and didn’t regret a thing. With my interest in Doctor Who and Star Trek flagging (Who’s last series sapped my enthusiasm and I can’t seem to get into any Trek series other than Voyager) I’ve been looking for a new sci-fi fix. Black Mirror is up there, but Stranger Things is even better. It’s mix of teen/coming of age storylines, sci-fi, horror and fantasy makes it appealing to a wide audience and, for anyone who is sick of everything in film and TV being set in New York, London or Los Angeles, its small country town setting is refreshing. Also, its only 8 episodes, which means it avoids the normal Netflix trap of being stretched out several episodes beyond its natural runtime (see Jessica Jones, Luke Cage, The Defenders and House of Cards’ last 3 seasons).

For those yet to watch it, the series is set in Hawkins, a small sleepy town in Indiana, USA. It revolves around the disappearance of Will Byers, a young boy, and the appearances of both Eleven (Millie Bobby Brown), a young girl who has escaped a nearby government lab, and an unknown Monster terrorizing the local woods. The focus is split between Will’s family (his older loner brother Jonathan and his increasingly hysterical mother Joyce, played by Winona Ryder), Will’s best friends Mike (Finn Wolfhard), Dustin and Lucas, local cop Jim Hopper (David Harbour) and Mike’s sister older Nancy.

Most of the time is spent with Mike, Dustin and Lucas, who take it upon themselves to find Will, while also trying to keep Eleven hidden from both their parents and the government agents looking for her. Hinging a series on young actors always carries some risk, but the quartet are all well-acted and, for the most part, relatable and engaging characters. Winona Ryder is also a great asset to the series, in a role that in the hands of a lesser actress might come across as irritating, as she starts to realise her son’s disappearance is not due to anything natural. Nancy’s story looks predictable at first as she falls for local bad-boy Steve, but after she becomes entangled with Will and his hunt for his brother’s kidnapper, she becomes one of the stronger parts of the show. Local cop Hopper likewise could have come across as a cliché, but David Harbour plays the role with such charm and understated turmoil that you can’t help but root for him.

It isn’t a flawless series. There are genre-based clichés everywhere you look (shifty government labs, terrible father figures, easily resolved cliffhangers etc.) but that’s probably inevitable given the amount of things Stranger Things is a homage to. The show is also largely predictable and plays out pretty much the way you expect. But, to be honest, if you can see past these issues, there’s precious little else that will annoy you. The direction and effects maintain a very high standard throughout, while the soundtrack is extremely effective and the 80’s songs that play intermittently are as well chosen as Guardian of the Galaxy’s were. The dialogue is never cringeworthy or clunky, and all of the actors put in good performances.

Ultimately, that’s the main reason this show works so well: the characterisation. Even supporting characters that seem irritating in the first few episodes (such as Mike’s friend Lucas and Nancy’s love interest Steve) have character arcs that make them more likeable later down the line. The antagonists, whether school bullies or heartless government creeps, aren’t exactly developed much as characters but serve their purpose well enough, and you will feel immensely satisfied when they get their comeuppance in latter episodes. Arguably its the Monster that works best out of the shows villains, as it feels suitably scary and animalistic without straying too close to creatures from other sci-fi or horror series.

Overall, the first season of Stranger Things is engaging throughout, but only really starts to grip you in its second half where the various plotlines start meshing and bringing the characters together more. The production is fautless, even if the plot utilizes too many genre clichés to be considered particularly original. The acting is universally strong and the characterisation is of a higher standard than at least 90% of other TV shows, and that’s the real reason I’d recommend this above most of Netflix’s other shows.

Rating: 4 out of 5.

I’ve already binged Season 2 so expect a review of that to be up soon (probably Saturday). Like this one I’ll keep it spoiler free. Good news: its even better than season 1.

The Capaldi Era Reviewed

Well that’s that. Peter Capaldi has bowed out as the 12th Doctor after 4 years in the role. Over his 3 series and 4 Xmas specials he’s had numerous very strong showings and has given us several diverse takes on his character, so here’s my tribute to Twelve’s era. First up, my take on his best (and worst) episodes!

Obviously, major spoilers for Series 8-10. If you haven’t watched them by now, that’s not my problem.

12’s Worst Episodes

5. Oxygen (Series 10) by Jamie Mathison – A missed opportunity. Oxygen got bogged down in its anti-capitalism message and forgot to have fun along the way. Zombies onboard a space station really should be scarier than this. The acting was decent, but the direction lacked any drive whatsoever and seriously undermined the tension.

Rating: 3/5

4. In The Forest of the Night (Series 8) by Frank Cottrell-Boyce – Boyce’s first contribution to the series isn’t bad, it just isn’t that interesting. The child actors aren’t terrible (like Angie and Artie in Series 7) but they don’t add much to proceedings, and while Capaldi, Coleman and Samuel Anderson (Danny – remember him?) are all on form, things never spark into life. The direction is good though, and the storyline is inventive enough (trees have reclaimed earth and brought the human race to a standstill). Like Oxygen, it’s environmental message just weighs the plot down a bit too much.

Rating: 3/5

3. The Girl Who Died (Series 9) by Jamie Mathison – ‘We’re Vikings!’. Not very convincing ones mate. Containing some of the worst extras ever to appear in modern Who, it’s a good thing The Girl Who Died also had the wonderful Maisie Williams guest starring, because it’s one of the weakest scripts in series Nine. Only the last 15 minutes (where I suspect Moffat took over from Mathison as lead writer) have any real oomph to them.

Rating: 3/5

2. The Lie of the Land (Series 10) by Toby Whitehouse – A really disappointing ending to the ‘Monk trilogy’. The performances carry it and help avoid it being a disaster, but the Monks are defeated far too easily and the whole ‘fake regeneration’ thing was just silly.

Rating: 3/5

1.  Sleep No More (Series 9) by Mark Gatiss. An episode that tried to do something different with its found footage storyline, but is let down by forgettable guest stars and some truly stupid sci-fi (I mean living dust from eyes coming alive? Seriously Gatiss?). It should have at least been scarier, but everytime there was a threat of tension, Reece Shearsmith (absolutely woeful – the worst guest star in Capaldi’s era) turns up with more dull narration to drag proceedings down again. The script itself isn’t actually that bad, but the execution lets it down.

Rating: 2.5/5

Fortunately these episodes were the exception to the rule in the Capaldi era. Most of his episodes received either a 3.5/5 or a 4/5 from me, with several getting higher than that. So next up, here’s my list of his five best outings as the Doctor.

12’s Best Episodes 

5. Listen (Series 8) by Steven Moffat The first episode that really showed Capaldi’s potential. From his opening monologue to the end credits, he holds you attention and never lets it go, while Moffat delivers his most inventive script since Blink. It isn’t flawless, but sheer clever scripting and acting prowess from the three leads ensure it was one of Series 8’s highlights.

Rating: 4.5/5

4. World Enough and Time (Series 10) by Steven Moffat. Series 10 may have been a bit disappointing, but if you didn’t get shivers/punch the air during the last five minutes of ‘World Enough and Time’, you aren’t a proper who fan. Seeing two Masters on screen together for the first time was immensely engaging, and Moffat’s script made the Cybermen creepier than they have been in decades. If only we’d had fewer spoilers going in…

Rating: 4.5/5

3. Face the Raven (Series 9) by Sarah Dollard. Well this one was truly heartbreaking as Clara finally oversteps the mark in her attempts to be like the Doctor. Capaldi, Coleman and Maisie Williams are on fire here, and Sarah Dollard makes one of the best debuts I can remember as the writer for arguably the most important story of series 9. The script is excellent, while the direction, acting and Murray Gold’s music combine to make the episode’s climax truly heartwrenching… I do wish Moffat hadn’t undone it in the finale.

Rating: 5/5

2. Dark Water (Series 8) by Steven Moffat. The first two-parter in 3 years got off to a flying start with Dark Water, which takes its time but builds and builds to a jaw-dropping final 15 minutes. Some seriously creepy ideas about the afterlife, the return of the Cybermen and the reveal of just who Missy really is combine to make this a truly great episode. Capaldi, Coleman, Anderson and Michelle Gomez really gave this their all.

Rating: 5/5

1.  Heaven Sent (Series 9) by Steven Moffat. The winning combination of Moffat’s writing, Capaldi’s acting, Talalay’s direction and Murray Gold’s music reached its apex here in Capaldi’s sublime one-man (well, almost) show. While personally I find Dark Water more entertaining, Heaven Sent is undoubtedly the better episode and is up there with the best of what Moffat’s ever written. But Capaldi is the unquestioned star of this show – I’ll repeat what I said it my main review – only Capaldi could have carried an episode like this so well. Even Eccleston, Tennant and Smith, all fine actors, wouldn’t have matched him here, and that’s about the highest compliment I can give.

Rating: 5/5

For anyone interested, here’s the average score each of Capaldi’s series has got from me:

Series 8: 3.96/5. Series 8 featured several great episodes and no failures, while the Missy arc was the most satisfying season long mystery we’d got since the cracks in time in Series 5. Capaldi’s darker, grouchier take on the Doctor is refreshing even if it doesn’t always hit the right notes, while Jenna Coleman really comes into her own here.

Series 9: 4.04/5. Series 9 is the best modern who has given us so far, and if Chibnall/Whittaker or anyone else bests it I’ll be pleasantly surprised. Two weak episodes and a disappointing season arc aside, everything works. Capaldi gives us the definitive version of his Doctor (edgy and not giving a damn, but somewhat mellowed compared to his first series) and gets some of his best material, while Jenna Coleman’s marvellous performance proves she deserves to be the longest serving companion in Modern Who, and her partnership with Capaldi was clearly something truly special.

Series 10: 3.75/5. A VERY average run despite its strong finale, series 10 was something of a disappointment. Moffat still delivered, but his support writers (with the exception of Rona Munro and Peter Harness) let him down, though Moffat has to accept some blame for the Vault Storyline going nowhere and John Simm’s return being too widely spoiled. Pearl Mackie was excellent as Bill, but rarely got material that let her show off her talents. Capaldi’s Doctor, unfortunately, mellows too much in this last season, into near-forgetability by the end. His performance is still there, but the promise of his darker take on the Doctor has vanished, which was a shame. Like Tennant and Russell T. Davies, I can’t help feeling Moffat and Capaldi stuck around one season too long…

To finish up, here’s my 10 favourite moments from the Capaldi era.

10. We Surrender (Mummy on the Orient Express, Series 8). One of the 12th Doctor’s first truly heroic moments is where he stands up to the Foretold, knowing he only has 66 seconds to make it stand down before it kills him. Great scene.

9. Hello Sweetie (The Husbands of River Song). While most of this Xmas special was focused on comedy, the moment where River finally realizes that Capaldi is the Doctor was very sweet, and Capaldi’s ‘Hello Sweetie’ knocks it out of the park.

8. Those Eyebrows (The Day of the Doctor). Okay, slight cheat, this isn’t in any Capaldi episodes, but come on. Capaldi’s Day of the Doctor cameo was amazing. What a way to introduce a Doctor.

7. Clara Leaves the Doctor (Kill the Moon, Series 8). 12’s patronising behaviour finally comes back to bite him as an upset Clara gives him both barrels and leaves the Tardis in tears. Coleman’s performance was simply marvellous.

6. The Pope Ruins Bill’s Date (Extremis, Series 10). Quite possibly the funniest scene in Who History as Bill gets a girl back to her flat only to find the Doctor has accidentally left the Pope in her bedroom. Talk about a passion killer.

5. Clara Dies (Face the Raven, Series 9). What more can I say. We all knew it was coming at some point in Series 9, but it still hit hard anyway. The fact that Clara is arguably my favourite companion didn’t make it any easier.

4. The Doctor’s Speech (The Zygon Inversion, Series 9) The Doctor’s anti-war speech was a powerhouse of a performance by Capaldi, and even if the Zygon two-parter wasn’t the most memorable bit of Series 9, his speech to convince both sides to stand down gives it a perfect denouement. Who’d have thought Capaldi would surpass this a mere 3 episodes later…

3. You Know Who I Am (Dark Water, Series 8). The Missy reveal was up there with the Daleks surprise appearance in Army of Ghosts and the Master’s initial return in Utopia. It’s one of the best cliffhangers in the Capaldi era, and Capaldi and Michelle Gomez absolutely nail the scene. Well she couldn’t keep calling herself ‘The Master’ now could she 😉

2. Hello Missy. I’m the Master (World Enough and Time, Series 10). Simm’s performance has never been better. The face pull just made it all the more perfect. We knew it was him, but the reveal was pulled off with such gusto that it was epic anyway. This scene alone made the disappointing Series 10 worthwhile.

1.  Breaking the Wall (Heaven Sent, Series 9). What else could it be. Not forgetting that Murray Gold delivers his best soundtrack in YEARS for this scene, the moment where Twelve finally escapes his prison after spending millions of lifetimes punching through a near-indestructible wall was both epic and insanely clever. Well done Capaldi and Moffat – we won’t forget this one in a while.

To sum up, while Capaldi’s final series prevents me from labelling his incarnation the best version of the Doctor (Tom Baker is probably never going to be surpassed), he proved beyond doubt that he was one of the finest actors to play the role, easily matching what Eccleston, Tennant and Smith had achieved before him. Good luck Jodie Whittaker, you’ve got one hell of an act to follow…

Star Trek Discovery Review

Starring Sonequa Martin-Green, Doug Jones, Jason Isaacs, Mary Wiseman, Antony Rapp and Michelle Yeoh.

Contains Minor Spoilers

It’s not been the best year for Sci-Fi on TV. Doctor Who’s run was distinctly average, Red Dwarf has only given us 1 good episode from 4 so far and then there’s Star Trek Discovery, whose opening episodes have majorly disappointed me.

I only got into Star Trek recently, thanks mainly to Netflix who put all 5 (The Original Series, Next Generation, Deep Space Nine, Voyager and Enterprise) live action Star Trek shows on its roster last year. I watched Voyager’s entire run and loved it, and I’ve delved into one or two of Next Gen’s episodes (mainly the ones with the Borg or Q) and enjoyed them. So when Netflix debuted a brand new Star Trek series with modern effects and a cast featuring a couple of famous faces, I thought I’d give it a go. I wish I hadn’t.

It does look brilliant. We’re talking cinematic level quality here. Netflix clearly spent a lot of money on this. A big space battle in episode 2 is up there with the kind of fights we’ve got from the Guardians of the Galaxy movies. The direction isn’t bad either, and the action scenes in general are high quality. But now I start running out of positives. There are several things which will annoy existing Star Trek fans, such as the utterly pointless redesign of the Klingons and how much more advanced the technology looks than the previous star trek series (which considering this is a prequel to every series but Enterprise is a bit stupid). But these are minor issues compared to the big one. The series’ tone and characters completely suck. It tries to be very dark and gritty, which is never what Star Trek has been about. The whole Klingon-Federation war which drives the shows plotline doesn’t really work because of the shows prequel status (i.e. you know the humans and their allies won’t lose, so the stakes are limited to the survival of the main cast). Sure, the TV series and movies occasionally veer into very dark territory, but normally as a exception to the more usual fun and hopeful vibe they have. Discovery is so concerned with putting flawed characters in morally compromised, depressing situations that it completely forgets to have any fun. (I.e. they went the Batman vs. Superman route when they should have been going for a Rogue One kind of tone). The characters don’t help matters either.

Sonequa Martin-Green isn’t a bad actor, but most Star Trek series hinge a lot on their lead, and Human/Vulcan hybrid Michael Burnham just isn’t interesting enough as a character to merit being a series lead. She lacks the likeability and charm of a Kirk, Picard, Sisko or Janeway, and to be honest, Vulcans are always pretty dull characters to focus on in Star Trek, so having a Vulcanized Human as the lead was probably never a good idea (Spock and Tuvok had their moments, but there’s not a lot of places you can take people who have such a limited emotional range).

The support cast aren’t much better. Jason Isaacs gets stuck in a pretty clichéd and thankless role as Captain Lorca, Doug Jones fails to give you any reason to care about Saru, and Antony Rapp’s engineer sucks the joy out of every scene he’s in. Mary Wiseman is the lone exception, as her perky, optimistic character offers much needed light relief. Unfortunately, she has no one similar to bounce off and this limits how well her character works. Michelle Yeoh is the best thing about the cast, but as a recurring guest star isn’t heavily enough involved to make much of a difference.

The Klingon sections also grow tiresome, mainly because the one Klingon with any screen presence is killed off early in the shows run, leaving a load of inadequate stand in villains to step in for the rest of the run. There’s no Worf or B’Elanna to give the Klingons a sympathetic face, and that makes the whole Federation-Klingon war a very one-sided affair.

After 4 episodes, I ran out of both enthusiasm and patience. Even though the individual episodes were relatively engaging, the overall plotline and cast weren’t. I’ve given up because I didn’t see any reason to persevere (normally I give a new show 5 episodes to prove itself, but this one showed so little potential I couldn’t be bothered). I started watching Deep Space Nine instead, and even though the first series of that show is a VERY mixed bag in terms of quality, the characters are engaging enough and the show delivered enough good episodes with the bad that I’ve stuck with it.

To sum up: if you have Netflix and want to try Star Trek, don’t bother with Discovery. Go watch Next Gen, DS9 or Voyager instead (or even the Original Series or Enterprise if your feeling brave). Discovery isn’t just bad Sci-fi, its bad Sci-Fi which barely qualifies as Star Trek. Honestly haven’t been this disappointed with Netflix before. The show may improve, but frankly, I’m not interested enough in its plot or characters to care.

Rating: 2 out of 5 (Lowest Series rating I’ve ever given).

Also: blandest Star Trek theme tune ever? Its just downright dull compared to the epic, mysterious or triumphant themes the other shows (and films) have.