Game of Thrones: The Bells Review

WARNING: MAJOR SPOILERS!!!

I said in my review of episode 3 that I could live with the show prematurely dispatching the White Walkers if the final 3 episodes were suitably epic. Judging by episodes 4 and 5, I can safely say that the show has delivered a worthy spectacle and maintained my interest going into the last episode.

The Bells was a raw, tense affair, which did not hold back in showing the sheer brutality of war. While all of Thrones’ previous epic battles have had high casualties, only ‘Hardhome’ had civilians being caught on the front lines the way that happened here. It was shocking even by Thrones standards. Miguel Saponchik delivered yet again in the directors chair (and there were no lighting issues this time either!). Maisie Williams has probably been the standout cast member this season – her reactions to the chaos unfolding around her here were perfectly portrayed, and reminded us that for all her training and cold kills, she’s still human. And still a hero. Unlike some female characters I could mention…

I won’t go into Daenerys’ arc and whether it was a betrayal of her character or the culmination of a long set-up – that’s something I will do a whole article on later. Needless to say, turning one of the show’s main ‘heroic figures’ into a villain is a bold move to make in the final season (I’m struggling to think of another show which has done that) but was probably a necessary one. Watching a victory over Cersei in the final episode would not have been a suitable replacement for the ending people expected at the start of the season (defeating the White Walkers in a last stand). Taking on a Mad Daenerys, on the other hand, is a far more unpredictable final conflict and one better suited to a finale. While I don’t necessarily agree with everything the showrunners have done this series, I can understand the vision they have pursued.

All the fans getting angry are missing one key point – while the showrunners have largely invented the majority of the last two seasons, they are still using George R.R. Martin’s broad vision for how the series is supposed to end. He told them three big twists the final books would contain a while back: one was Shireen, one was Hodor, and now it seems likely (unless the final episode has an even bigger shock in store) that the last twist was Daenerys going full Mad Queen and laying waste to King’s Landing. Blaming the showrunners for rushing the last two seasons is a viable compliant, blaming then for where Daenerys story has ended is not. On the other hand, I can understand if you dislike some of the show’s inconsistent logic (there’s no way Ghost and that many Dothraki should have survived the doomed charge in episode 3, and the accuracy of the Scorpion weapons seems to change every episode to suit the needs of the plot). Let’s face it, Euron happening to wash up on the same beach Jaime was on is a bit lazy. In many ways this season has reminded me of ‘Beyond the Wall’ in season 7. Utterly gripping as a spectacle, but lacking the logic and tight plotting of the earlier seasons.

But as with ‘Beyond the Wall’ I’m enjoying it too much to really care about its flaws. Lord of the Rings is filled with stupid, non-sensical moments and easy fixes and plot armour, but people love it regardless. I can understand why people might be getting turned off by this season. But in my view, while I would never claim its the best season of Thrones, it’s still a very enjoyable one. Even if you hated the rest of it, the Hound vs. Mountain fight has to be one of the best scenes in Thrones’ history. It’s brutal, its unrelenting, and it packs a gut punch. The Hound realising he couldn’t win was the most realistic moment in this episode, and his final sacrifice to kill the monstrous Gregor was the perfect exit for the character. The Jaime/Euron fight was similarly engrossing, and I liked how neither could outright beat the other – both ended up mortally wounded when a lesser show would have had Jaime triumph after a prolonged struggle. Jaime ultimately sacrificing everything to be with Cersei at the end was heartbreaking, and I couldn’t give a fig that the ‘Valonqar’ theory wasn’t followed. Kudos to Lena Headey as well, for giving a hated character a genuinely tragic exit. For all her flaws, Cersei lost everything and couldn’t save the man she loved or her unborn baby – that is far more satisfying than seeing her die at Arya, Jaime or Daenerys’ hands would have been.

Overall, the Bells is a grim, shocking episode that is part war-film, part fantasy epic, and part horror story. Its one of Thrones’ best episodes – haters be damned. You can go and wither with Last Jedi haters on the pyre of insignificance for all I care – true fans don’t hate great shows or films for not playing out the way they expected or not living up to incredibly convoluted theories.

Final Thought: Pretty sure Daenerys just killed more people than Joffrey, Tywin, Walder Frey, the Boltons, Euron, Cersei and the FUCKING NIGHT KING managed combined. Just putting it out there.

Rating: 5 out of 5!

Next Time: Daenerys’ victory seems likely to be short lived, with Tyrion and Jon both horrified at her actions and Arya looking decidedly murderous…

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