Monthly Archives: February 2019

Revisiting Mass Effect: Andromeda

As Bioware releases Anthem to a chorus of how buggy the cutscenes are, you get a feeling of deja vu.

It’s been two years since Mass Effect: Andromeda’s lacklustre launch, with fans rushing to criticise its buggy gameplay and terrible character animations. If it wasn’t for Battlefront II’s even more disastrous launch later in the year, Andromeda would probably have gone down as the worst big release of 2017. I did one playthrough of it after release, got bored, and left the game alone for the next 2 years.

But now, with a lot of patches and fixes and no new Dragon Age or Mass Effect in sight yet (and no interest in purchasing Anthem – like Fallout 76, it just isn’t something I’d have ever been interested in, good or not), I got back into Andromeda and was able to give it a second chance. Given that I couldn’t be asked to review it first time round, I thought I’d get round to it now. And I have one key question to answer: now the bugs are mostly fixed, is Andromeda worth playing?

Andromeda always had some plus points. The dialogue system had borrowed some good ideas from Dragon Age and was a lot more unique than the mostly binary good or renegade choices of Mass Effect 3. The planets always looked amazing and the graphics were very good quality for the environments. The combat was far more fluid than in previous games and the ability to mix and match combat, tech and biotic abilities gave you a lot of freedom in how you shaped your character. Ryder (male or female) is actually a great main character – in several ways they are more interesting than Commander Shepard, if nowhere near as badass.

There were also several drawbacks that are still present. The soundtrack is pretty forgettable compared to the first three games. Ryder’s crew has a few bright sparks but is not as engaging as the Normandy’s squad mates. Some of the choices Ryder has to make aren’t particularly consequential, and several of them are so one-sided that its unlikely you will ever pick the alternative (such as not allying with the Krogan in exchange for a power core that does not impact the game). Some of the romance options are quite badly implemented – with progression locked behind long questlines and some options which get locked if you go too far down another romance sub-plot (the lack of clarity on this is quite irritating).

However, several things that were initially irritating won’t bother you so much on a second playthrough. The fact that Andromeda only introduced two new alien races was originally quite disappointing, but it won’t bother you on a second playthrough. Equally, the similarities between the Kett and Remnant storylines and that of the Reapers and Protheans aren’t really an issue once you know what to expect. The fact that there are only 7 or so planets to explore is still a bit annoying, but to be honest if you enjoy what’s already there it won’t be a huge factor in your opinion of the game.

Then we get to the bugs. The facial animations are, mercifully, all fixed by this point, with no more dead eyed expressions or creepy smiles. There are far fewer bugs present that shortly after launch – a few still remain (such as people or things randomly floating) but I’ve yet to find one on my replays that has impacted gameplay or forced me to reload a save.

Overall, Andromeda is quite a fun game if you’re willing to forgive it’s shortcomings. Once you accept it isn’t up there with the first trilogy, it becomes a lot more palatable. The gameplay is fun, the game looks great and the storyline is mostly engaging. A few bland characters and forgettable side quests aside, you’ll enjoy what you find here. If you were put off by initial reaction to it, it might be worth picking up now, particularly as it’s currently very cheap to buy.

Rating: 4 out of 5