Jessica Jones: Season 1 Review

Starring Krysten Ritter and David Tennant

Looking for a quick Netflix binge or a new superhero fix? Jessica Jones might be just what you’re looking for…

Warning: Minor spoilers!

Marvel might have stolen a march on DC in film since the Dark Knight Trilogy, but thanks to Arrow, Flash, Gotham and Supergirl, DC’s pretty much owned the TV side of things. Or at least, it did whilst it’s only competition was the by-the-numbers and underperforming Agents of Shield. But Marvel has struck back. Agent Carter, Daredevil and Jessica Jones are three Marvel shows that have received critical acclaim, and as I had some time on my hands this summer, I decided to check them out, starting with Jessica Jones.

Jessica Jones isn’t your standard superhero TV show. She doesn’t wear a costume, have an alter-ego or superhero name, and the shows much more psychological than action-packed, and has a very noir feel, emphasised by the trippy opening titles and unusual, jazzy soundtrack. Jessica has some classic superhero powers (namely super-strength) but the show avoids the usual cliché of having a villain with similar powers for her origin story or first onscreen outing (aka like Superman and General Zod, Iron Man and Iron Monger, Green Arrow and Malcolm Merlyn etc.).

Instead we get Kilgrave (David Tennant) who might just be the most unsettling villain I’ve seen since the J0ker. His powers? Mind-control. He can compel others to do anything – be it throw coffee in their own face, kill someone they love or jump off a rooftop. Very few superpowered villains are terrifying simply by the nature of their powers – Kilgrave is an exception. Having a super-strong heroine go up against a villain who can effectively turn anyone in the whole city, her closest friends or even herself against her leads to a very tense 13 episodes. That said, he isn’t an entirely unsympathetic villain, his motivation and his past, once later episodes shed light on them, spark some pity for the man, helped in part by Tennant’s marvellous performance.

The acting in general is superb, Ritter makes Jessica a very complex heroine to root for – you won’t agree with everything she does in her quest to catch Kilgrave. The supporting cast all shine, particularly Carrie-Anne Moss as ruthless lawyer Jeri and Mike Colter as fellow superhuman Luke Cage.

The show as a whole is very dark – dealing with very adult topics such as suicide, rape, abortion and PTSD – sometimes you forget this is a superhero drama – anyone who wants the happy go-lucky feel of Marvel films, go somewhere else – this is properly compelling drama that only Winter Soldier and Civil War have come close to delivering. It has it’s lighter moments, particularly in the opening episodes, but overall this is something of an emotional roller-coaster.

So far all good. Issues? Well the show has a few. It’s 13 episode run-time feels undeserved – a few unnecessary plot developments could have been scrapped a delivered a much tighter 10 episode run. Will Simpson, a love interest of Jess’ surrogate sister Trish, has a plotline that really drags in the second half of the season, and even though it’s obviously setting something up for a second season it detracts from the main plot too much to have been necessary. The final showdown between Jess and Kilgrave is satisfying to watch but predictable. In general though, it was a solid first season and a sign that on TV at least, Marvel is willing to take risks with it’s storyline and characters.

Overall: Murky morals, an unsettling villain and a conflicted heroine makes this compelling viewing. It’s not a smash hit and won’t be everyone’s cup of tea, but its very much worth a look.

Season Rating: 3.5 out of 5 (would have been 4/5 if it hadn’t dragged out the story too long)

Reviews coming soon: iZombie – season 1 review, followed by Suicide Squad, Orange is the New Black Season 4 and iZombie season 2!

 

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